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'[EE]:: Re-use of Microwave Oven power transformers'
2019\04\01@024135 by RussellMc

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Retrospectively obvious, & brilliant.

 Reuse of Post-consumer E-waste for Low Cost Micropower Distribution

http://www.microformer.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Reuse-of-Post-Consumer-E-waste-for-Low-Cost-Micropower-Distribution.pdf



Distribution of power from eg a Wind Turbine to a load 500 + feet away at
120 VAC may result in line losses of 20%.
Using a pair of microwave oven transformers to provide a 2kV distribution
system reduces line losses to under 0.1%  using the same conductors.
Transformer losses for an optimised solution may add 10% to the 2kV system,
and using the transformers with little or no modifications may double the
loss,  but as line length increases transformer losses remain the same as
line losses increase.

_________________

 Abstract—A novel medium voltage distribution system to electrify rural
areas in developing nations using post consumer resources is presented in
this paper. Using transformers repurposed from discarded microwave ovens to
form a medium voltage microgrid, power may be distributed over an area of a
few square kilometers while interconnecting a wide variety of generation
sources and storage at a fraction of the cost of traditional systems.
Microwave oven transformers (MOTs) are systematically characterized for
optimal performance in these cases and construction guidelines are
provided. A candidate distribution system using MOTs was constructed to
deliver power from a small wind turbine to a small building at a
horticulture field station. Results from this demonstration project are
provided.
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2019\04\01@045428 by David C Brown

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Before reading the article my immediate response is: you say "using the
same conductors", but are conductors rated for 120v safe for use at 2,000v?
__________________________________________
David C Brown
43 Bings Road
Whaley Bridge
High Peak                           Phone: 01663 733236
Derbyshire                eMail: spam_OUTdcb.homeTakeThisOuTspamgmail.com
SK23 7ND          web: http://www.bings-knowle.co.uk/dcb
<http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/~dcb>



*Sent from my etch-a-sketch*


On Mon, 1 Apr 2019 at 07:43, RussellMc <.....apptechnzKILLspamspam@spam@gmail.com> wrote:

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2019\04\01@055706 by AB Pearce - UKRI STFC

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> Before reading the article my immediate response is: you say "using the same conductors", but are conductors rated for 120v safe for use at 2,000v?

Well, if using wires on poles (likely in an outback situation) then the problem comes down to what insulators are being used on the poles rather than the actual wire itself and whatever insulation it has.



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2019\04\01@061615 by David C Brown

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I have now read the article and the test installation used required,
because of frequency of large farm machinery, the cables to be buried.   I
would be very cautious about burying 2kV cables directly into the ground
without substantial protection, which would tent to detract from the
el-cheapo diy approach expounded in the article.
__________________________________________
David C Brown
43 Bings Road
Whaley Bridge
High Peak                           Phone: 01663 733236
Derbyshire                eMail: dcb.homespamKILLspamgmail.com
SK23 7ND          web: http://www.bings-knowle.co.uk/dcb
<http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/~dcb>



*Sent from my etch-a-sketch*


On Mon, 1 Apr 2019 at 10:59, AB Pearce - UKRI STFC <.....alan.b.pearceKILLspamspam.....stfc.ac.uk>
wrote:

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2019\04\01@072901 by RussellMc

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On Mon, 1 Apr 2019 at 23:18, David C Brown <EraseMEdcb.homespam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> wrote:

> I have now read the article and the test installation used required,
> because of frequency of large farm machinery, the cables to be buried.   I
> would be very cautious about burying 2kV cables directly into the ground
> without substantial protection, which would tent to detract from the
> el-cheapo diy approach expounded in the article.
>
> Implementation details left as an exercise for the student :-).

Using beer bottle insulators and #12 fencing wire (possibly with a ground
return :-) ) one could get "a few kilometres" at acceptable losses with a 2
kVish overhead line.

The great  gain is of course from the I^2R losses  (especially if the
target system is 120 VAC based as in the paper) so that you get a loss
reduction of (Vhv/Vlv)^2.
For say 2000 V and 120 V that's ~= 275:1 and even at 230 VAC it's a 75 x
reduction in losses.

Discovering 2000 VAC on a beer bottle insulated overhead line may be "a bit
of a shock".


      Russell
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2019\04\01@073944 by David Van Horn

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I didn't see anything taken into account for capacitive losses either.
--
David VanHorn
Lead Hardware Engineer

Backcountry Access, Inc.
2820 Wilderness Pl, Unit H
Boulder, CO  80301 USA
phone: 303-417-1345  x110
email: david.vanhornspamspam_OUTbackcountryaccess.com 

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2019\04\01@113053 by Harold Hallikainen

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Interesting! I had a microwave oven die a few months ago. I was thinking
of salvaging the transformer for use in an amateur radio power amplifier.
Never got to it, though. Instead bought a Dentron Clipperton L at a local
hamfest.

Harold


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2019\04\01@130149 by Jean-Paul Louis

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A lot of DIYer's use microwave transformers to make spot welding tool. They remove the secondary, and rewire it with a couple of turns of heavy gauge stranded wire, and weld battery tabs or similar use cases.
Jean-Paul N1JPL 

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 On Mon, Apr 1, 2019 at 6:00 AM, AB Pearce - UKRI STFC<@spam@alan.b.pearceKILLspamspamstfc.ac.uk> wrote:   > Before reading the article my immediate response is: you say "using the same conductors", but are conductors rated for 120v safe for use at 2,000v?

Well, if using wires on poles (likely in an outback situation) then the problem comes down to what insulators are being used on the poles rather than the actual wire itself and whatever insulation it has.



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2019\04\01@131203 by Isaac M. Bavaresco

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Another nice reuse for MOTs is for building DIY spot welder.

Just remove the secondary winding and replace it with one or two turns of
very thick automotive battery cable. At both ends of the cable fix two
solid copper electrodes with pointed tips.

Works well for thin sheets of steel and stainless steel. Did not test other
materials.

Cheers,
Isaac

Em seg, 1 de abr de 2019 03:43, RussellMc <KILLspamapptechnzKILLspamspamgmail.com> escreveu:

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2019\04\02@010039 by Sean Breheny

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I did not read article but I am skeptical. The microwave oven transformers
I have experience with only like to operate close to the intended operating
point of the magnetron. They are made with the absolute minimum iron in the
core and they saturate very easily. I tried used one to step up to 2kV and
found that it would draw excessive current with no load on the secondary.
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