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'[EE] Basic Electronic Training (for purchaser)'
2009\06\18@171706 by Forrest W Christian

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I've got a person who is very bright, picks things up quickly, etc., who
is going to start doing some, or all, of my purchasing for me.  She's
got quite a bit of science background, but not a lot, if any,
electronics/electrical background.   Probably has a grade-school-level
knowlege of things like insulators and circuits, etc.

She is one of those people (like myself) which works much better if she
can understand the general concepts of what she is doing instead of just
being given a specific list of "do x, y, and z, and don't worry why".  
For that reason, I'm planning on doing a quick "electronics overview"
with her... showing things like how different capacitors react
differently in circuits, etc.   Basically sitting down at the workbench
and building a few circuits on the protoboard, etc.    That will give me
an opportunity to go over the basics that a purchasing person would need
to know, and help her understand what types of things are critical or
not.   Probably burn a resistor or two to demonstrate the wattage value,
etc.

I'd also like to point her at some web resources which would complement
this... going over basic things like what is a capacitor, and what types
of capacitors they are, what the wattage value of a resistor means,
etc.   But everything I seem to be able to find is really heavy on
theory (little practical value for someone not designing), or really
really basic, and again doesn't provide much useful information.

Again, thinking in the context of a purchasing person, who needs to be
able to locate, and suggest (not approve) acceptable substitutes for
components, etc....   Is anyone aware of some web resources which would
help, or even suggestions about the "Training"?

Thanks,

-forrest

2009\06\18@180909 by Dr Skip

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The ARRL Handbook for sure. I used it as a wee lad a long time ago and still
refer to it for forgotten details. Any recent edition will do.

Next up, "Practical Electronics for Inventors", 2nd Ed.

After both she'll be designing oscillators, hooking them to transmission lines,
and building op amp filters to go with it just for the fun of it... ;) There's
even digital in there.

Seriously, I recommend those to all students. Better than the web (you can read
it anywhere and not worry about batteries) and the right balance between theory
and practical. You're fully prepared to go down either path afterward.

-Skip


Forrest W Christian wrote:
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2009\06\18@190315 by jim

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Get  the book "Becomming a Radio Amateur".  It has all the basics you are
speaking of.

Jim KA9QHR
{Original Message removed}

2009\06\18@191918 by Vitaliy

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Forrest W Christian wrote:
{Quote hidden}

Forrest, I would say that you're better off hiring someone with electronics
background, than teaching someone electronics (even if they are very
bright).

I say this from experience. What works for us, is a tight collaboration b/w
engineering and purchasing. Engineering folks are heavily involved during
the design and set-up phase. Eventually when all the kinks are worked out,
the person who does the purchasing takes care of making sure parts are
reordered on time, logistical issues, etc. The person in charge of
purchasing is very bright, and she's great at what she does, but she's not
comfortable with things that are too technical. Anytime she has a question
that's over hear head, she talks to one of the engineers. This works very
well.

If you are really set on teaching this person electronics, and she has a
genuine interest in learning, consider enrolling her in a basic electronics
course at a local community college. I'm sure it will be more effective and
will cost less in the end.

Vitaliy

2009\06\18@192543 by Marcel Duchamp

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Forrest W Christian wrote:
>
> Again, thinking in the context of a purchasing person, who needs to be
> able to locate, and suggest (not approve) acceptable substitutes for
> components, etc....   Is anyone aware of some web resources which would
> help, or even suggestions about the "Training"?
>
> Thanks,
>
> -forrest

Electronics training is a great idea, especially if the person is eager
to learn.  I would guess that it's about 1/3 of what a purchasing person
needs though.

Things rarely taught (if ever) in electronic seminars, books etc. are
the less tangible but very important things like IC package differences,
ROHS substitutes, bulk vs cut tape vs reels, and so on.  That's about
another 1/3.  And the last 1/3 might be tricks of the trade - where to
find parts, when to buy them, how many to buy, how to get lowest
prices/best service, etc.

For the actual electronic knowledge, I would make a copy of "Art of
Electronics" (H&H) available to the person.  It supplies lots for them
to soak up and plenty of stuff for them to ask you questions about. If
they eat it up, I would give them their own copy.

2009\06\19@080529 by Andrew Burchill

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>
> I'd also like to point her at some web resources which would complement
> this... going over basic things like what is a capacitor, and what types
> of capacitors they are, what the wattage value of a resistor means,
> etc.   But everything I seem to be able to find is really heavy on
> theory (little practical value for someone not designing), or really
> really basic, and again doesn't provide much useful information.
>

Hi Forrest,
Colin Mitchell has put a huge amount of work into teaching
practical electronics, his first magazines were about 1983.

http://www.talkingelectronics.com/



--
...AB

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