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'[EE] FCC cert low cost RF modules'
2009\04\04@223031 by alan smith

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client wants wireless...doesnt like the prices for certified modules...$10 and up.  Has anyone seen anything lower cost in smallish quantities?

I looked at some of ths stuff Sparkfun sells...Laipac modules...sub $4 range.  Nothing on either Sparkfun or Laipac come out and say...you need to certify the product if you use these.  Now I "assume" that even tho they are in the ISM band, and low power, if my client decides to use this in the product, he really should get FCC testing done on them and certify his product...at the tune of 2K-3K tho.  Else he spends $10 on a cerified device.

Am I correct on this?


     

2009\04\05@182344 by Paul Hutchinson

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: spam_OUTpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspammit.edu On Behalf Of alan smith
> Sent: Saturday, April 04, 2009 10:30 PM
>
> client wants wireless...doesnt like the prices for certified
> modules...$10 and up.  Has anyone seen anything lower cost in
> smallish quantities?
>
> I looked at some of ths stuff Sparkfun sells...Laipac
> modules...sub $4 range.  Nothing on either Sparkfun or Laipac
> come out and say...you need to certify the product if you use
> these.  Now I "assume" that even tho they are in the ISM band,
> and low power, if my client decides to use this in the product,
> he really should get FCC testing done on them and certify his
> product...at the tune of 2K-3K tho.  Else he spends $10 on a
> cerified device.
>
> Am I correct on this?

Yes, they are intentional transmitters so they need an FCC ID on them to
avoid potential fines of around $10K.

Paul Hutch

2009\04\05@224833 by Harold Hallikainen

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flavicon
face

>
> Yes, they are intentional transmitters so they need an FCC ID on them to
> avoid potential fines of around $10K.
>
> Paul Hutch

I agree. See subpart C for intentional radiators at
http://www.hallikainen.com/FccRules/2009/15/ . Also, at the bottom of each
rule section is CiteFind, where you can FCC website documents that cite
that rule, such as violation notices they've sent.

Harold


--
FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com - Advertising
opportunities available!

2009\04\06@132826 by Vitaliy

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alan smith wrote:
> client wants wireless...doesnt like the prices for certified modules...$10
> and up.  Has anyone seen anything lower cost in smallish quantities?
>
> I looked at some of ths stuff Sparkfun sells...Laipac modules...sub $4
> range.  Nothing on either Sparkfun or Laipac come out and say...you need
> to certify the product if you use these.  Now I "assume" that even tho
> they are in the ISM band, and low power, if my client decides to use this
> in the product, he really should get FCC testing done on them and certify
> his product...at the tune of 2K-3K tho.  Else he spends $10 on a cerified
> device.
>
> Am I correct on this?


Does it really only cost $2k to get a device FCC certified? Maybe I'm
thinking about CE?

Vitaliy

2009\04\06@140815 by Matt Pobursky

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On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 10:27:42 -0700, Vitaliy wrote:
> alan smith wrote:
>> client wants wireless...doesnt like the prices for certified
>> modules...$10 and up.  Has anyone seen anything lower cost in smallish
>> quantities?
>>
>> I looked at some of ths stuff Sparkfun sells...Laipac modules...sub $4
>> range.  Nothing on either Sparkfun or Laipac come out and say...you
>> need to certify the product if you use these.  Now I "assume" that even
>> tho they are in the ISM band, and low power, if my client decides to
>> use this in the product, he really should get FCC testing done on them
>> and certify his product...at the tune of 2K-3K tho.  Else he spends $10
>> on a cerified device.
>>
>> Am I correct on this?
>>
>
> Does it really only cost $2k to get a device FCC certified? Maybe I'm
> thinking about CE?

I was thinking the same thing. Around here most of the quotes I've gotten
have been in the $8-10K range.

Matt Pobursky
Maximum Performance Systems

2009\04\06@141309 by John Day

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face
At 01:27 PM 4/6/2009, you wrote:
>Does it really only cost $2k to get a device FCC certified? Maybe I'm
>thinking about CE?
>
>Vitaliy

CE is easy and usually self-certified.

FCC and whatever European EMC/EMI/RFI testing is always more
expensive, and $2-3k for something small is a reasonable place to start.

John



2009\04\06@150024 by olin piclist

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John Day wrote:
> FCC and whatever European EMC/EMI/RFI testing is always more
> expensive, and $2-3k for something small is a reasonable place to start.

Maybe for a unintentional radiator, but for a intentional radiator $3K is
unrealistically low, at least for FCC testing around here.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2009\04\07@104824 by M. Adam Davis

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On Mon, Apr 6, 2009 at 1:27 PM, Vitaliy <.....spamKILLspamspam@spam@maksimov.org> wrote:
> Does it really only cost $2k to get a device FCC certified? Maybe I'm
> thinking about CE?

Ballpark figures I use:

FCC cert (Non intentional radiator) $2k
FCC cert (Intentional radiator) $8k

UL/safety (battery powered, doesn't connect to AC or anything else
such as a charger or computer) $1k
UL/safety (AC powered, or attaches to AC powered device) $2k

EU/CE certifications are similar.

Most places will do both at the same time for $1-2k more.

So FCC/UL/CE certification with an intentional radiator that plugs in
to AC line is about $11-12k.  This testing is thorough enough you can
probably also sell to Canada with no extra cost - once you get to the
$10k+ range, many certification companies will certify for a range of
countries beyond the usual US/EU/Canada for little more cost - $100
per report for a few reports per country.

FCC/UL testing for a battery powered device that does not
intentionally radiate is about $3k, but can only be used/sold in the
US.

That's assuming it passes the first time (ie, you've already performed
pre-testing, and are certain they will not find problems.  Otherwise,
lather, rinse, repeat, $$$)

Also, it's been a few years since I last updated my mental model, so
the prices may be slightly higher now.

-Adam

2009\04\07@170257 by alan smith

picon face

OK...I *was* thinking of Non intentional radiator, my mistake.  And that was in the 2K-3K range.

So we sorta deviated from the real question, but I am pretty sure the answer is...yes.  If you use one of these inexpensive RF transmitters, such at

http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8945

in a product, not just a hobby thing, its mandatory to get the "product" certified, else run the risk of fines, etc.


--- On Tue, 4/7/09, M. Adam Davis <stienmanspamKILLspamgmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> --

2009\04\09@102806 by Bob Axtell

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You'll find a reasonable price from Sid at

Timco Eng Inc  1-888-472-2424        FCC CERT TESTING
               PO Box 370
               849 SR 45
               Newberry, FL 32669
               1-352-472-2030 fax
               Sid Sanders

His outfit is very reputable. He was originally in the Miami area, but
one of the hurricanes
ran him out, so he is near Tampa now. His test environment is VERY quiet.

--Bob A

On 4/6/09, Olin Lathrop <@spam@olin_piclistKILLspamspamembedinc.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

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