Searching \ for '[EE] Magnet wire insulation stripping' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: massmind.org/techref/index.htm?key=magnet+wire+insulation
Search entire site for: 'Magnet wire insulation stripping'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE] Magnet wire insulation stripping'
2019\01\01@125601 by Joe Mc Cauley

picon face
So I was able to get hold of someone in ICEoxford/Cryobitz who supply these looms this morning & they say that the insulation is polyester enamel. Their advice is strip with a sharp knife! I'm not keen on this, so if anyone has better ideas, I'm all ears.

Thanks,

Joe

{Original Message removed}

2019\01\01@130149 by David Van Horn

flavicon
face
I googled "What dissolves polyester enamel" and found this interesting advice:

"One more secret from good old Dr. Wavebourn: aspirin. I put a wire on a tablet and press it by tip of hot soldering iron.
Attention: vary bad and harmful smell, don't inhale it, use vented camera or an open air!"

{Original Message removed}

2019\01\01@140622 by AB Pearce - UKRI STFC

face picon face
> I googled "What dissolves polyester enamel" and found this interesting advice:
>
> "One more secret from good old Dr. Wavebourn: aspirin. I put a wire on a tablet and press it by tip of hot soldering iron.
> Attention: vary bad and harmful smell, don't inhale it, use vented camera or an open air!"

Grief, what caused him to do that? Did he have a headache, or was finding stripping wire a real headache :)))



-- http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
.

2019\01\01@154416 by AB Pearce - UKRI STFC

face picon face
Well, if acid is what is needed I would try dipping the wire end in some vinegar then washing it off well.


{Original Message removed}

2019\01\01@160335 by Dr Skip

picon face
Or make a solution with citric acid crystals and water and try various concentrations.

Rust removers typically use phosphoric acid which might be useful too.



On January 11, 2019 3:44:10 PM EST, AB Pearce - UKRI STFC <spam_OUTalan.b.pearceTakeThisOuTspamstfc.ac.uk> wrote:
>Well, if acid is what is needed I would try dipping the wire end in
>some vinegar then washing it off well.
>

-- http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
.

2019\01\02@030759 by Perry Curling-Hope

picon face
As the man ( Sergio ) says, get hold of some methylene chloride
(Dichloromethane)
It is 70% + of what this Ecostrip stuff is
The phenol and formic acid are minor components, I suspect to render the
resulting goo more viscous, so it sticks to the wire whilst the solvent
does its job.
On 12 Jan 2019 4:03 AM, "smplx" <.....smplxKILLspamspam@spam@allotrope.net> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

-- http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
.

2019\01\03@004007 by John Ferrell

face
flavicon
face
Just guessing with the chemical specs, a extra hot solder pot with an inert shield gas ought to do it. Cold enough to not melt the copper, hot enough to float/destruct the polyester. The shield gas keeps the copper from oxidizing.

On 1/11/2019 10:04 PM, smplx wrote:
> On Thu, 10 Jan 2019, Joe Mc Cauley wrote:
>
>> Chemical stripping is what I have used many years ago (Eccostrip from
>> Emerson & Cuming). That's no longer available here. Nor are any
>> strippers containing methylene chloride. I was looking at something
>> called dip strip
>> (https://www.eraser.com/products/replacement-parts/dip-strip/) which
>> seems to require a hot pot to use. However even this appears unavailable
>> apart from the US & Asia.

-- John Ferrell W8CCW
   Julian NC 27283
 It is better to walk alone,
than with a crowd going the wrong direction.
                  --Diane Grant

-- http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
.

2019\01\03@014121 by Spehro

picon face

Can confirm the eraser product works well on Nb-Ti and pure Nb.

It’s caustic soda and similar stuff that is not too bad at all (of course it’s designed to break down organic materials so getting any at 400’C on your skin, let alone eyes, is problematic), but I don’t think it’s carcinogenic - see the MSDS. You can use it in a solder pot- you don’t need to buy their pot. I presume you need the wires clean and uncontaminated to get good welds.

— Spehro Pefhany

Sent from a Microsoft, Android or Apple device  
(Either mobile or desktop)

{Quote hidden}

--
http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist

2019\01\03@032643 by Lyle Hazelwood

picon face
The financial hardship of Electricians:
It's the only job where you are expected to strip just to make ends meet.

Yeah, I know. But it's 3:30 AM and I simply couldn't resist.

Lyle Hazelwood
-- http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
.

2019\01\03@071420 by smplx

flavicon
face
part 1 3217 bytes content-type:text/plain; charset="utf-8" (decoded base64)

The process of forming an ester from a carboxylic acid + alcohol is
called esterification.

www.chemguide.co.uk/organicprops/alcohols/esterification.html

The process can be revered by adding an acid or base to the ester.
However if a base is used then the salt of the carboxylic acid is
produced instead of the carboxylic acid. This reversal would suggest a
good basis for an attack and breakdown of the polyester enamel.

www.chemguide.co.uk/organicprops/esters/hydrolysis.html

I know nothing about the chemistry of niobium and cannot comment as to how
a particular acid or base would react with it - except to say that
preliminary research has raised a question as to its behaviour with sodium
hydroxide, so caution is advised.

I know that sodium hydroxide has a high melting point (318 degrees C -
well above that of solder) so I have researched the possibility of a
eutectic mix containing sodium hydroxide. It turns out that a NaOH / KOH
mix of 41 wt.% NaOH has a melting point of 170 degrees C

www.researchgate.net/publication/231539312_Phase_Equilibria_in_the_Potassium_Hydroxide-Sodium_Hydroxide_System

Furthermore looking for alternative solvents has lead me to:

rfelektronik.se/manuals/Datasheets/solventguide.pdf

which might be useful.

Regards
Sergio Masci


On Sun, 13 Jan 2019, Spehro wrote:

> Can confirm the eraser product works well on Nb-Ti and pure Nb.
>
> It’s caustic soda and similar stuff that is not too bad at all (of course it’s designed to break down organic materials so getting any at 400’C on your skin, let alone eyes, is problematic), but I don’t think it’s carcinogenic - see the MSDS. You can use it in a solder pot- you don’t need to buy their pot. I presume you need the wires clean and uncontaminated to get good welds.
>
> — Spehro Pefhany
>
> Sent from a Microsoft, Android or Apple device
> (Either mobile or desktop)
>
>> On Jan 13, 2019, at 12:40 AM, John Ferrell <.....jferrell13KILLspamspam.....triad.rr.com> wrote:
>>
>> Just guessing with the chemical specs, a extra hot solder pot with an
>> inert shield gas ought to do it. Cold enough to not melt the copper, hot
>> enough to float/destruct the polyester. The shield gas keeps the copper
>> from oxidizing.
>>
>>> On 1/11/2019 10:04 PM, smplx wrote:
>>>> On Thu, 10 Jan 2019, Joe Mc Cauley wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Chemical stripping is what I have used many years ago (Eccostrip from
>>>> Emerson & Cuming). That's no longer available here. Nor are any
>>>> strippers containing methylene chloride. I was looking at something
>>>> called dip strip
>>>> (https://www.eraser.com/products/replacement-parts/dip-strip/) which
>>>> seems to require a hot pot to use. However even this appears unavailable
>>>> apart from the US & Asia.
>>
>> --
>> John Ferrell W8CCW
>>    Julian NC 27283
>>  It is better to walk alone,
>> than with a crowd going the wrong direction.
>>                   --Diane Grant
>>
>> --
>> http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
>> View/change your membership options at
>> mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
>
>
part 2 197 bytes content-type:text/plain; name="ATT00001.txt"
(decoded base64)

--
http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist

2019\01\03@131446 by AB Pearce - UKRI STFC

face picon face
> The financial hardship of Electricians:
> It's the only job where you are expected to strip just to make ends meet.
>
> Yeah, I know. But it's 3:30 AM and I simply couldn't resist.

Oh thanks for that Lyle, I'll have to put a sign up on the wall at work for our wiremen (and lady) ... :)))



-- http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
.

2019\01\03@181715 by David Robertson

flavicon

Hello,

I tried to reply to this thread a few times but it never made it through to the list due to an email screwup on my end. The message contents are below - I hope these may be of some use.


On 11 Jan 2019, at 10:25, David Robertson <EraseMEdavidspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTrobertson.yt> wrote:
If the old paint stripper worked satisfactorily then the best option is probably to buy pure dichloromethane (methylene chloride) from a lab supplier.

DCM based paint strippers are banned in the EU and some other places due to a series of deaths resulting from inadequate ventilation. One of the metabolism products is carbon monoxide which is the source of the toxicity.

However since you won’t be spreading the DCM over a large surface area the fumes are not going to be especially hazardous.

David



On 12 Jan 2019, at 17:47, David Robertson <davidspamspam_OUTrobertson.yt> wrote:
Actually, if phenol is present in some paint strippers then this is perhaps the active agent in the aspirin trick- phenol is definitely a pyrolysis product of salicylic acid, and quite possibly also acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin).

Phenol and formic acid wouldn’t turn DCM into goo - formic acid is a slightly viscous liquid in pure form, and although pure phenol is solid, in small concentration there’s no way it’d do more than slightly increase the viscosity of the DCM solution. There’s probably other polymeric crud in there to turn it into goo. Bear in mind that safety datasheets do not need to list non-hazardous ingredients.

David



On 13 Jan 2019, at 12:36, David Robertson <@spam@davidKILLspamspamrobertson.yt> wrote:
You probably don’t want molten NaOH/KOH, just a hot strong aqueous solution. Remember that it is a hydrolysis reaction, ie splitting up the molecule by addition of water. Having an excess of water will help. That said - commercial NaOH and KOH usually contains about 10% w/w of water anyway - it’s very hard to get it totally dry because it’s very hygroscopic. If you leave some NaOH prills sitting out in a humid environment they will absorb enough water to liquefy completely (deliquescence).

Anyway, hydrolysis is likely to be FAR too slow to be practical for this use, and the necessary use of a hot corrosive mixture (either strongly basic or strongly acidic) is both a safety concern and may possibly corrode the underlying metal wire.

A suitable organic solvent would still be preferable - and by the sounds of things, DCM is known to work - at least, with this particular kind of insulation. I do have some reels of enamelled copper wire, of the non-solderable variety, which seem to be immune to the effects of every solvent I have in my lab, including dichloromethane and trichloromethane (chloroform). So what works for one enamelled wire may not work for others.

David



On 13 Jan 2019, at 12:44, David Robertson <KILLspamdavidKILLspamspamrobertson.yt> wrote:
Then again, if it’s used in a commercial product, then perhaps I’m wrong about NaOH being too slow to be practical...



--
http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist

2019\01\10@105231 by Joe Mc Cauley

picon face
Back in August 2013, I enquired on the list as to what people use to strip enamel from magnet wire. None of the suggestions back then worked out for me & happily for me the problem went away at the time. Sadly however, like all problems that don't get definitively solved, this one has come back. I have 2 cryogenic looms of 100um wire to strip & solder with 48 wires in total. This wire is quite brittle (Niobium-Titanium). Mechanical scraping has not proved a good option so far, nor has burning of the insulation (solder pot). Ideally I need a chemical stripper that is available in Europe.

Chemical stripping is what I have used many years ago (Eccostrip from Emerson & Cuming). That's no longer available here. Nor are any strippers containing methylene chloride. I was looking at something called dip strip (https://www.eraser.com/products/replacement-parts/dip-strip/) which seems to require a hot pot to use. However even this appears unavailable apart from the US & Asia.

In desperation I'm asking again in case anyone has since found a solution. I have to admit that when my original requirement for this went away, I did not follow up at the time.

Thanks for any help,

Joe
-- http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
.

2019\01\10@105231 by AB Pearce - UKRI STFC

face picon face
As this is such a specialist wire have you checked with the wire manufacturer to see what they recommend?


{Original Message removed}

2019\01\10@123555 by David Van Horn

flavicon
face
Rotary or other mech strippers won't work with that fine of a wire.
Can you get info on the coating from the vendor?  I'd take that to a solvent vendor and find your chem.


{Original Message removed}

2019\01\10@123555 by Joe Mc Cauley

picon face
Thanks for the replies guys. I have asked the guy who wants this done to find out regarding the coating & will await a reply. Meanwhile if anyone has any ideas.....


Thanks,


Joe

________________________________
From: RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesTakeThisOuTspammit.edu <spamBeGonepiclist-bouncesspamBeGonespammit.edu> on behalf of AB Pearce - UKRI STFC <TakeThisOuTalan.b.pearceEraseMEspamspam_OUTstfc.ac.uk>
Sent: 10 January 2019 17:36:22
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public.
Subject: RE: [EE] Magnet wire insulation stripping

As this is such a specialist wire have you checked with the wire manufacturer to see what they recommend?


{Original Message removed}

2019\01\11@144318 by David Van Horn

flavicon
face
I would never have thought of it, for sure.
But it is an acid...

-----Original Message-----
From: RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu <piclist-bouncesEraseMEspam.....mit.edu> On Behalf Of AB Pearce - UKRI STFC
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 12:06 PM
To: Microcontroller discussion list - Public. <EraseMEpiclistspammit.edu>
Subject: RE: [EE] Magnet wire insulation stripping

> I googled "What dissolves polyester enamel" and found this interesting advice:
>
> "One more secret from good old Dr. Wavebourn: aspirin. I put a wire on a tablet and press it by tip of hot soldering iron.
> Attention: vary bad and harmful smell, don't inhale it, use vented camera or an open air!"

Grief, what caused him to do that? Did he have a headache, or was finding stripping wire a real headache :)))



--
http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive View/change your membership options at http://mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist

-- http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
.

2019\01\11@161638 by David Van Horn

flavicon
face
BE CAREFUL  Some rust stain removers  are diluted hydrofluoric acid.

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ershdb/emergencyresponsecard_29750030.html

I forget the brand but I have some at home.  VERY nasty warning label.


-- http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
.

2019\01\11@161638 by smplx

flavicon
face


On Thu, 10 Jan 2019, Joe Mc Cauley wrote:

> Chemical stripping is what I have used many years ago (Eccostrip from
> Emerson & Cuming). That's no longer available here. Nor are any
> strippers containing methylene chloride. I was looking at something
> called dip strip
> (https://www.eraser.com/products/replacement-parts/dip-strip/) which
> seems to require a hot pot to use. However even this appears unavailable
> apart from the US & Asia.

Aparently methylene chloride is sold for welding certain plastics under the name "Di-clo."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dichloromethane

Regards
Sergio Masci
-- http://www.piclist.com/techref/piclist PIC/SX FAQ & list archive
View/change your membership options at
mailman.mit.edu/mailman/listinfo/piclist
.

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2019 , 2020 only
- Today
- New search...