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'[EE] Selling electronics in the US'
2009\01\30@122317 by James Holland

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Hi
I am trying to find out what the legal requirements are for selling
electronics in the United States, so far Google hasn't been any help. The
equipments concerned are 24V powered vibration and proximity sensors. If
someone could point me in the right direction I would be very grateful.
Thanks
James



'[EE] Selling electronics in the US'
2009\02\02@105707 by alan smith
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I think its going to be dependent on what market your selling into.  If its industrial, you might need a NRTL or CE sticker on it, but even without it, doesn't preclude you from selling it in the states.  Its really going to be up to your end users...will they purchase something without the agency approvals.  There are alot of products on the market that do not have either FCC or NRTL registrations, and both are really litigation tools.  Of course the FCC requirement probably would not apply to you, but doing immunity at least on your own might be a good thing.


--- On Fri, 1/30/09, James Holland <spam_OUTj_hollandTakeThisOuTspambtopenworld.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> --

2009\02\02@105738 by alan smith

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I think its going to be dependent on what market your selling into.  If its industrial, you might need a NRTL or CE sticker on it, but even without it, doesn't preclude you from selling it in the states.  Its really going to be up to your end users...will they purchase something without the agency approvals.  There are alot of products on the market that do not have either FCC or NRTL registrations, and both are really litigation tools.  Of course the FCC requirement probably would not apply to you, but doing immunity at least on your own might be a good thing.


--- On Fri, 1/30/09, James Holland <.....j_hollandKILLspamspam.....btopenworld.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> --

2009\02\02@111008 by Harold Hallikainen

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> I think its going to be dependent on what market your selling into.  If
> its industrial, you might need a NRTL or CE sticker on it, but even
> without it, doesn't preclude you from selling it in the states.  Its
> really going to be up to your end users...will they purchase something
> without the agency approvals.  There are alot of products on the market
> that do not have either FCC or NRTL registrations, and both are really
> litigation tools.  Of course the FCC requirement probably would not apply
> to you, but doing immunity at least on your own might be a good thing.


If you have a clock frequency over 9kHz, I believe the unintentional
radiator requirements of FCC part 15
(http://www.hallikainen.com/FccRules/2009/15/ ) apply. These are very
similar to CE EMC requirements, so a lab that tests for CE can often throw
in FCC for a low cost.

Harold



--
FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com - Advertising
opportunities available!

2009\02\02@120805 by olin piclist

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alan smith wrote:
> I think its going to be dependent on what market your selling into.
> If its industrial, you might need a NRTL or CE sticker on it,

CE is a European thing.  In the US you have to make sure that the product
doesn't radiate or conduct on the power line past what the FCC allows.  In
most simple cases where your product isn't intended to radiate at all, you
don't actually need to go thru compliance testing, although you'll be in
trouble if it is found to fail later.

For consumer items you will want UL or similar approval.  These are not
legally required, but if something happens you really want to be able to
prove you used "best practises".

For low cost items you sell a few 100/year, it would take a specific
complaint for any legal authority to look at it.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2009\02\03@125352 by James Holland

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{Quote hidden}

Thank you. We do CE mark our products but a customer asked why we don't UL
approve them, they implied that it was a legal requirement. I did establish
that it wasn't but couldn't find any other specific requirements. We don't
directly connect to any mains supply and I will have a look at the FCC
requirements. I'm sure that we will be OK because they are analogue sensors
with no fast edges.
Cheers
James


2009\02\03@141103 by Paul Hutchinson

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> -----Original Message-----
> From: RemoveMEpiclist-bouncesspamTakeThisOuTmit.edu On Behalf Of James Holland
> Sent: Tuesday, February 03, 2009 12:54 PM
>
> Thank you. We do CE mark our products but a customer asked why we don't UL
> approve them, they implied that it was a legal requirement. I did
> establish
> that it wasn't but couldn't find any other specific requirements. We don't
> directly connect to any mains supply and I will have a look at the FCC
> requirements. I'm sure that we will be OK because they are
> analogue sensors
> with no fast edges.

Sounds like you should be exempt from Part 15 digital device
testing/certification. To quote Part 15's definition of a digital device:
"An unintentional radiator (device or system) that generates and uses timing
signals or pulses at a rate in excess of 9,000 pulses (cycles) per second
and uses digital techniques;"

Paul


> Cheers
> James
>
>
> -

2009\02\03@152215 by Richard Prosser

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2009/2/4 James Holland <j_hollandEraseMEspam.....btopenworld.com>:
{Quote hidden}

James

You might find that while UL isn't a legal requirement, it is a
requirement specified by your customers insurers.

RP

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