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PICList Thread
'[EE] Transformer wiring help'
2009\07\13@175603 by Carl Denk

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I got this transformer rated: *Input:* 110/220VAC 60Hz *Outputs:* 24VAC
@ 2A (12V-0V-12V) and I'm nut sure how to hook it up.  I bought it for
HVAC control power at 24 VAC, but other applications possible.


http://www.mpja.com/prodinfo.asp?number=7844+TR

The diagram on the input side, shows 2 windings, like a center tap, but
open at the middle. Black wire to both left ends, and red wire to both
right ends, that's a red and a black at the center. Do I connect the
blacks together, and the reds together for 110 volts,

The output shows one center tapped winding with blue wires on the ends,
and yellow center tap.

I understand the center tap output with my choices for +12, -12  or 24
VAC, Am thinking for 220 VAC, I want to connect the center red and black
together, and the outer red and black go to the 220 VAC. For 110 volt,
do I connect the reds together to say the hot 110, and the blacks
together to the neutral 110?

Thanks in advance.

2009\07\13@180318 by Harold Hallikainen

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> I understand the center tap output with my choices for +12, -12  or 24
> VAC, Am thinking for 220 VAC, I want to connect the center red and black
> together, and the outer red and black go to the 220 VAC. For 110 volt,
> do I connect the reds together to say the hot 110, and the blacks
> together to the neutral 110?

Yes, that's right. For 240VAC, connect the two primaries in series. For
120VAC, connect the two primaries in parallel. This is equivalent to a
single primary with double the wire size (cross-sectional area).

Harold

--
FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com - Advertising
opportunities available!

2009\07\13@182548 by olin piclist

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Carl Denk wrote:
> I got this transformer rated: *Input:* 110/220VAC 60Hz *Outputs:*
> 24VAC @ 2A (12V-0V-12V) and I'm nut sure how to hook it up.

With 110V in you put the two primaries in parallel, with 220V you put them
in series.  In either case be very sure to get the polarities right, else
poof.  You could try to bring it up slowly from a variac output to make
sure.


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2009\07\13@185548 by Carl Denk

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Thanks much :)

Harold Hallikainen wrote:
>> I understand the center tap output with my choices for +12, -12  or 24
>> VAC, Am thinking for 220 VAC, I want to connect the center red and black
>> together, and the outer red and black go to the 220 VAC. For 110 volt,
>> do I connect the reds together to say the hot 110, and the blacks
>> together to the neutral 110?
>>    
>
> Yes, that's right. For 240VAC, connect the two primaries in series. For
> 120VAC, connect the two primaries in parallel. This is equivalent to a
> single primary with double the wire size (cross-sectional area).
>
> Harold
>
>  

2009\07\13@190314 by Peter van Hoof

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In 99 % of the cases red and red goes on one and black and black on the other pole.

If you want to make absolutely sure the primarys can be connected black to black
and red to red put the two reds on line of 110volt ac.

Put one of the blacks on neutral (leave the secondary open for now)

Measure voltage between the two blacks. if your voltage is near 0 volt ac polarity is correct
and line belongs on the w=two reds, neutral on the two blacks (or reversed)

If the voltage is near 220 volt one of the two coils needs to be reversed. (black of one coil
and red of the other on phase, and the other two on neutral.)

Peter van Hoof



{Original Message removed}

2009\07\13@191226 by Carl Denk

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I don't have a variac. It is clear on the input side, that the windings
are in a straight line, just like a center tap, but broken at the
center. Both windings have black to the left side, and red at the right
handed side. That makes the outers a black and red, with the center also
a black and red. For 220 it seems clear that I connect to outer red and
blacks to the power hot and neutral, and the center red and black to
each other. For 110, it seems that black and black, and red and red to
the power hot and neutral. This would go with the common way of doing
things.

Thanks for the thoughts. If I blow it, no big thing, it was cheap, came
along for the ride with some things I needed. :)

Olin Lathrop wrote:
{Quote hidden}

2009\07\13@193757 by Marcel Duchamp

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Carl Denk wrote:
> I don't have a variac. It is clear on the input side, that the windings
> are in a straight line, just like a center tap, but broken at the
> center. Both windings have black to the left side, and red at the right
> handed side. That makes the outers a black and red, with the center also
> a black and red. For 220 it seems clear that I connect to outer red and
> blacks to the power hot and neutral, and the center red and black to
> each other. For 110, it seems that black and black, and red and red to
> the power hot and neutral. This would go with the common way of doing
> things.
>
> Thanks for the thoughts. If I blow it, no big thing, it was cheap, came
> along for the ride with some things I needed. :)
>

To easily test without fear, use a lightbulb in the primary circuit.  Or
drive it from a signal generator and watch the output on a scope. Or...
lots of possibilities.

2009\07\13@195517 by Carl Denk

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Like this, it is simple with minimum of equipment. :) :)

Peter van Hoof wrote:
> In 99 % of the cases red and red goes on one and black and black on the other pole.
>
> If you want to make absolutely sure the primarys can be connected black to black
> and red to red put the two reds on line of 110volt ac.
>
> Put one of the blacks on neutral (leave the secondary open for now)
>
> Measure voltage between the two blacks. if your voltage is near 0 volt ac polarity is correct
> and line belongs on the w=two reds, neutral on the two blacks (or reversed)
>
> If the voltage is near 220 volt one of the two coils needs to be reversed. (black of one coil
> and red of the other on phase, and the other two on neutral.)
>
> Peter van Hoof
>
>
>
> {Original Message removed}

2009\07\13@233716 by Derward Myrick

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Carl,  I have used 1000s of these and  center red goes to center black for
220
V and use the other red and black as input. Black to black and red to
red and this is the 120 input. I have found these to be very good
transformers,
I have been using these for several years.

Derward Myrick



{Original Message removed}

2009\07\14@082340 by Carl Denk

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Thanks much, there was other items that appeared on MPJA  E-mail
advertising that were too good to be true that were on my moderate
priority shopping list. This transformer came along for the ride as a
spare for our HVAC system that is much more detailed than the typical.  
Unless someone has an earth shaking comment, thanks for the help, thread
closed. :) :)

Derward Myrick wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> {Original Message removed}

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