Searching \ for '[EE] Weston Engineering Notes from 1946' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: massmind.org/techref/index.htm?key=weston+engineering
Search entire site for: 'Weston Engineering Notes from 1946'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[EE] Weston Engineering Notes from 1946'
2009\03\04@114744 by Jon Chandler

picon face
Several years ago I found a collection of Weston Instrument Engineering
Notes from 1946 - 1949 in near perfect condition at a garage sale.  
They've been in the bottom of my desk drawer since then, and don't
appear to have any value to collectors.  They're too awesome to keep
buried away, so I've started scanning them and posting them on my web site.

A tiny bit of background about Weston.  They were founded in 1888 and
did a lot of pioneering work in the EE field.  Their cadmium cell was
THE reference for the volt for about 100 years.  One of the articles in
the Engineering Notes discussed how the cells were made.  Start by
*distilling* mercury for one side of the cell and working with cadmium
for the other.  I'm sure OSHA wouldn't think much of their safety
precautions at the time.  In later years, Weston was known for their
photographic exposure meters - turns out the film speed rating system in
use today was developed by Weston.

Weston seems to have dropped from existence in the mid-80s after a
series of acquisitions and mergers.

The Engineering Notes make interesting reading.  Some parts point out
the huge changes in technology over the last 60 years, while other parts
are good references to  this day.  Note some of the beautiful line
drawings and plots shown.  Remember, those nice looking calibration
curves didn't start in Excel and come out of the laser printer.

I'll be adding more of the collection as time allows.  Enjoy!

Find thee notes at  http://www.slbench.com


Jon

2009\03\04@121807 by Harold Hallikainen

face
flavicon
face
THANKS for posting these! I've added a link on by Broadcast History wiki
at http://louise.hallikainen.org/BroadcastHistory/ .

When I was growing up, I had a Weston mA meter. It was a big round thing
that weighed 10 pounds. Quite impressive!

Harold


--
FCC Rules Updated Daily at http://www.hallikainen.com - Advertising
opportunities available!

2009\03\04@140707 by Robert LaBudde

picon face
At 11:44 AM 3/4/2009, Jon Chandler wrote:
>Several years ago I found a collection of Weston Instrument Engineering
>Notes from 1946 - 1949 in near perfect condition at a garage sale.
>They've been in the bottom of my desk drawer since then, and don't
>appear to have any value to collectors.  They're too awesome to keep
>buried away, so I've started scanning them and posting them on my web site.
><snip>

These documents may still have active copyrights.

==========================================================
Robert A. LaBudde                      Email: spam_OUTralTakeThisOuTspampobox.com
824 Timberlake Drive                   Tel: (757) 467-0954
Virginia Beach, VA 23464-3239          Fax: (757) 467-2947
==========================================================

2009\03\05@040238 by Jon Chandler

picon face
It's possible however Weston as a company disappeared about 20 years
ago.  I know they were acquired by some other company and their name
appeared associated with the new owners but later was dropped.  On the
web is a letter of inquiry sent to Weston in about 1990, with an answer
provided by a former employee.  If there is a remnant of Weston in
whatever company took them over, Engineering Notes from 60 years ago are
probably long forgotten.

As far as I know, these Engineering Notes are not a part of any library
collection.  One or two libraries do have archives of Weston materials.

I suspect the editor of the Engineering Notes, Mr. John Parker, would be
delighted to know that the fruits of his labors are being enjoyed many
years after they were published.

If anyone does have a legitimate copyright claim and objects to making
the Engineering  Notes available to the public, I'll remove them.


Jon



Robert LaBudde wrote:
> These documents may still have active copyrights.
>
> ==========================================================
> Robert A. LaBudde                      Email: .....ralKILLspamspam@spam@pobox.com
> 824 Timberlake Drive                   Tel: (757) 467-0954
> Virginia Beach, VA 23464-3239          Fax: (757) 467-2947
> ==========================================================
>
>  

2009\03\09@202706 by zipwize

picon face



I worked for Weston Instruments from 1984 to 1988. During this period they made mostly aircraft instruments. The era of analog multimeters and digital instruments had already passed by the time I got there.The d'Ars o nval Movement (permanent magnet/moving coil) was quite an art. I was given a beautiful AC voltmeter that had a vented wood case with a balance bubble, meter zero, and connection knobs. I sold it for a song. I spent a lot of time in the old records as a manufacturing engineer. I worked on the same coil winding machines that were used for a half century before me. I worked in the standards lab every day where they had the original copy of Dr. Weston's design record book. I heard stories that Dr. Weston use to collect the carbon from the smoke stack because it was the purest he could find. There is a plaque in the park across the street that marked a point where the magnetic field was correct enough to calibrate compasses. Otherwise the iron in the ground distorts the direction. At one time the meter movements had cardinal marks that were hand painted by technicains with phosphorescent paint (glow in the dark). This was done by hand with a paint brush. This was an art. Unfortunaltely this was mostly done by women who had horible birth defects caused by the phosphorescent paint. This was the downfall of Weston Instuments. It was only a question of time that it finally closed when I was there. The drawings and manufacturing details were amazing compaired to what you see today.



I want to point out a man called Tom Kelly how worked there for about 20 years before I got there. He was my boss and I have not found a smarter man since then. I have worked directly for several PhD EE's but he had vision beyond his time. Another person who had worked there for longer was Victor Fonseca. He ran the calibration lab. He took care of the old instruments and equipment that Dr. Weston worked with. There was another man who was an engineer before me that visited Weston from time to time. He had  many antique cars that he kept in prestine condition. It was an indication to the attention to detail that he provided to Weston in the golden days. He had a handlebar moustache.



We they knocked down the smoke stack they failed to notify the airlines at Newark Airport. The pilots would use the smoke stack to double check the runway lineup during bad weather landings. For the next weeks there were many scared pilots that were looking for the smoke stack that they considered as a landmark.



I designed a video base inspection and calibration system that automatically read the pointer on analog gauges or seven-segment displays on digital instuments and recorded the readings. This provided automatic closed-loop inspection. I did this on a PC-XT with Microsoft QuickBasic. It had a Fluke calibrator, a National Instruments GPIB card, and ofcourse a video framegrabber (Data-Translation). It would print out a data sheet automatically. This was an impressive task back then.



There are still people alive that worked there and know more of the story than I do. But I enjoyed talking about this again. I worked for Ametek US Gauge for a few months after they bought what was left of Weston. It broke my heart and I had to leave.


{Original Message removed}

2009\03\09@204630 by Marcel Duchamp

picon face
zipwize@comcast.net wrote:
>
>At one time the meter movements had cardinal marks that
> were hand painted by technicains with phosphorescent paint (glow in
> the dark). This was done by hand with a paint brush. This was an art.
> Unfortunaltely this was mostly done by women who had horible birth
> defects caused by the phosphorescent paint. This was the downfall of
> Weston Instuments.

Very interesting reminiscence!

BTW, perhaps the paint was radium based?

2009\03\09@221127 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
zipwize@comcast.net wrote:
> At one time the meter movements had cardinal marks that were hand painted
> by technicains with phosphorescent paint (glow in the dark). This was done
> by hand with a paint brush. This was an art. Unfortunaltely this was
> mostly done by women who had horible birth defects caused by the
> phosphorescent paint. This was the downfall of Weston Instuments. It was
> only a question of time that it finally closed when I was there.


Forgive me for being skeptical, but the dangers of radioactive paint were
well known by then. There was a high-profile lawsuit in the 1920s that even
found its way into high school textbooks:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Radium_Corporation

A quick Google search revealed nothing about a similar incident happening at
Weston Instruments. Maybe I'm using the wrong search terms?

Vitaliy

2009\03\10@083349 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
>>At one time the meter movements had cardinal marks that
>> were hand painted by technicains with phosphorescent paint (glow in
>> the dark). This was done by hand with a paint brush. This was an art.
>> Unfortunaltely this was mostly done by women who had horible birth
>> defects caused by the phosphorescent paint. This was the downfall of
>> Weston Instuments.

> Very interesting reminiscence!
>
> BTW, perhaps the paint was radium based?

Almost certainly Radium based.
Many workers used to "point" there brushes by sucking them - which certainly
wouldn't have helped.

Traditional WW2 era luminous dial watches used radiu toi excite the paint.
Wwaring such a watch on the inside of the wrist to protect the watch
sometimes (often?) resulted in cancer of the adjacent leg bone :-(.

AFAIR the radium excited luminous paint has a bluish appearance rather than
the generally greener glow of optically excited phosphors.
The BOGO light has a luminous glow ring to allow it to be found in the dark
fwiw.




          Russell




2009\03\10@140216 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Russell McMahon wrote:
{Quote hidden}

I am still very skeptical about this sort of thing happening in the 1980's
(or even two decades earlier).

What you are describing, happened in the early 1900s, at a different company
(see my other post in this thread).

Vitaliy

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2009 , 2010 only
- Today
- New search...