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PICList Thread
'[EE] Writing EE-related articles'
2009\05\13@180547 by olin piclist

face picon face
Bob Axtell wrote:
> Now for something completely different:
> Elektor is looking for English-language authors. I think you have a
> decent technical book in your treatise on uses of the PIC10Fxxx,
> and/or your PIC programming concepts. Look 'em up on their website.
> They'll pay a royalty.

These things usually pay a pittance at best although there may be some
exposure value.  I've written a few things as it made sense for me, but
every time I've explored doing it more regularly the arrangement didn't seem
beneficial enough for me to be worth it.  Still, I sent a short message to
the address listed on the web page.  I'll be surprised if anything comes of
it.  I'll keep folks posted here on what they say in case others are
interested in writing articles or whatever it is they are looking for.

I've never looked at a Elektor magazine.  The web site gives the impression
it's another one of those hobbyist to semi-professional electronics
magazines full of contrived projects.  Does anyone actually read that stuff?
These magazines used to be about how to solve all the world's problems with
a 555 timer, a 741 opamp, and a 2N3055 transistor.  Now it's probably a
16F84, a 324 quad opamp, and a handful of 2N2222A transistors.  Much better.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2009\05\13@183530 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I've never looked at a Elektor magazine.  The web site gives the impression
> it's another one of those hobbyist to semi-professional electronics
> magazines full of contrived projects.  Does anyone actually read that stuff?

For hobbyists it is not a bad magazine (and one of the few left), but
compared to 10y ago it contains an awful lot of re-edited-appnotes, and
sponsored articles about nearly unobtainable components. The articles
that are relevant to hobbyists tend to be reader-provided and based on
16F84's (if not 16C84).

Note: I do advertise in the Dutch edition.

> These magazines used to be about how to solve all the world's problems with
> a 555 timer, a 741 opamp, and a 2N3055 transistor.  Now it's probably a
> 16F84, a 324 quad opamp, and a handful of 2N2222A transistors.  Much better.

Actually there should be more of such articles, because that is where
the newbies learn their stuff from.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2009\05\13@185959 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
I think they have branched out and now sell hardback books as well as
the hobbyist stuff.

I agree, i remember their hobbyist bent in the early years. But I
think it might be worthwhile now. Remember that writing books
generates a low, steady income over time.

Frankly, the best moneymakers seem to be erotica writers (so I
understand). I've been told that ebook erotica pays the author 25-40%;
that's a good return on one's time. In any case, I have to get
permission from my wife...

--Bob

On Wed, May 13, 2009 at 3:06 PM, Olin Lathrop <spam_OUTolin_piclistTakeThisOuTspamembedinc.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2009\05\13@200515 by cdb

flavicon
face


:: The articles
:: that are relevant to hobbyists tend to be reader-provided and
:: based on
:: 16F84's (if not 16C84).

I haven't seen a 16F84 major project in Elektor for sometime. They
seem to be slewing towards Atmel products with a sprinkling of various
ARM projects thrown in. You do see the F84 pop up in the bumper summer
edition.  Elektor don't publish contributions directly, they take the
circuit and Elektorise it, same for the text.

Some of those 'readers contributions' seem to come from professors at
university. Wouter you're not upset that one of your colleagues got
the gig for providing tutorial type projects (I forget his name) a
couple of years back? :)

Now if anyone has the Tanbo kit, I'm interested.

I find their books are a bit disappointing as are some of their
special CD's. Personally I preferred the layout of the 80's magazines,
the big problem then was as mentioned they used such esoteric parts
for some projects and DIL were expensive even if they stocked them.

I still think their audio projects worth while especially the valve
and hybrid ones.

Don't know how much they pay, but I do know a US magazine used to pay
upto US$750 for a normal project, they've reduced that to about $300 I
think now, and the annoying thing is having to wait at least a month
after publication to get paid - though I suppose that is in case they
find the circuit has been published before.

Colin
--
cdb, .....colinKILLspamspam@spam@btech-online.co.uk on 14/05/2009

Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk  

Hosted by:  http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=7988359







2009\05\14@035619 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>> Elektor is looking for English-language authors. I think you have a
>> decent technical book in your treatise on uses of the PIC10Fxxx,
>> and/or your PIC programming concepts. Look 'em up on their website.
>> They'll pay a royalty.
>
>These things usually pay a pittance at best although there may be some
>exposure value.

Elektor also have a very tied down deal with releasing code for micros. Some
code they do release through their web site, but a lot of it requires the
reader to purchase a preprogrammed chip from their store, and the original
writer of the code is unable to publish it elsewhere.

2009\05\15@012958 by Vis Naicker

flavicon
face
Alan B. Pearce :
>Elektor also have a very tied down deal with releasing code for micros.
Some
>code they do release through their web site, but a lot of it requires the
>reader to purchase a preprogrammed chip from their store, and the original
>writer of the code is unable to publish it elsewhere.

Double side pcbs with 3-4 traces in inductance ( and frequency ) meters. PAX
amplifier and internet radio which you would not construct at home - blatant
advertising because it . SMT oven and half dozen articles about it and smt
tech that have been covered on the net. Too many articles about Renasas
mcu's.  

On the other hand, the SDR published looks an interesting device. Further,
there was also a low component (bc547 + xtal+passives) SDR that mixed a
3.9xxMhz oscillator to the incoming signal, and the 12Khz signal fed into a
pc sound card for processing - a 5 minute circuit to get started with WWVB
decoding.

The Bascom articles using ATmega88 was also valuable to those getting
started. The Digibutler using the Freescale Coldfire (April 2008) looks
interesting. The http://www.mikroe.com advert about constructing a mp3 player was
the most interesting article recently though.

The pecking order is Nuts and volts < EPE < Elektor < Circuit Cellar. N&V
must be making a lot by advertising revenue but I skim it and no longer buy
it.

2009\05\20@082710 by olin piclist

face picon face
Remember this thread from a week ago?  Bob Axtell pointed out that Elektor
was looking for authors and suggested I contact them.  I sent them a email
message using the address on their web page.  Here is what I wrote:

 I understand you are looking for people to write articles or other
 publications.  I have done such things before and am willing to explore
 what you are looking for that matches what I can talk authoritatively
 on, how you want to structure the business arrangement, etc.  My areas
 of expertise include Microchip PIC development, analog and digital
 circuits, switching power supply details, and the like.  My contact
 information is:

 Olin Lathrop
 Embed Inc
 410 Great Road
 Littleton, MA  01460
 (978) 742-9014
 <email address was here>

The real message inluded my real email address.  I only deleted it here
since I don't want it in the various archives.

Just now, a full week later, I get this response from someone identified as
Paul Ridgway in the email header:

 Dear Olin,

 Thanks for your interest in technical writing with Elektor.

 I am the freelance deputy publisher for this activity, which is original
 books.

 The starting point would be a compelling title and a contents
 index..which we ( you and me) could discuss for suitability for an
 Elektor book.

 I look forward to your response

 Best Wishes,

 Paul

It's clear the next step would be a phone call since there are many
questions that are best dealt with interactively.  However, he didn't call
me and didn't even give me his phone number so that I could call him.  He
gave little more information than the web site, admitted we should "discuss"
things, but gave no means of doing so.  Duh.  The only contact information I
have is his email address from the header.  This would be a very painful
process if it takes a week to get each set of questions half answered.

It looks like way too much trouble just to find out whether there is
anything worth persuing here.  I've got plenty of guaranteed gainful and
interesting work to keep me busy that spending this much effort on something
with such a low probability of usefulness isn't worth it.  Screw this.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2009\05\20@100016 by alan smith

picon face

sounds like a form letter response...at least you did get something back.  I've seen alot of "requests" for technical articles, and for what they end up paying, its never really worth it, unless your retired and have nothing else to do.  I think some do it in order to get the name out there, others because of the kind nature to share the knowledge.  But I'm with you, too many other active projects to spend my time on than deal with editors that worry about number of words, how it fits, nice pictures over the real technical content.


     

2009\05\20@105205 by John Coppens

flavicon
face
On Wed, 20 May 2009 08:28:10 -0400
olin_piclistspamKILLspamembedinc.com (Olin Lathrop) wrote:

> It's clear the next step would be a phone call since there are many
> questions that are best dealt with interactively.  However, he didn't
> call me and didn't even give me his phone number so that I could call
> him.  He gave little more information than the web site, admitted we
> should "discuss" things, but gave no means of doing so.  Duh.  The only
> contact information I have is his email address from the header.  This
> would be a very painful process if it takes a week to get each set of
> questions half answered.

I think you are treating Elektor as a (too) high-end tech journal. As
everything nowadays, I'm suspecting they barely survive. The guy is
probably replying from his home, and his 'deputy publishing officer'
title is just that - a title. I doubt they even have a complete staff in
the office, except maybe for the advertising.

Don't expect much pay, and don't expect much editorial influence or
interaction either - they barely check what they publish. A while
ago, I found an article on a circuit I designed many years earlier (no
credit). It was unusual enough to be very recognizable.

John

2009\05\20@111059 by olin piclist

face picon face
John Coppens wrote:
> I think you are treating Elektor as a (too) high-end tech journal. As
> everything nowadays, I'm suspecting they barely survive. The guy is
> probably replying from his home, and his 'deputy publishing officer'
> title is just that - a title. I doubt they even have a complete staff
> in the office, except maybe for the advertising.

Probably all true, but that doesn't make it less rude to take a full week to
reply when they specifically solicited people to contact them, and I'm sure
his "home office" has a phone.

I read it as "Some management bozo dreamed up this silly idea of asking
people out there to write books.  I'm the poor schmuck stuck having to deal
with the loosers that got laid off and now think they want to be writers
because all the jobs bagging groceries or asking if you want fries with that
are filled.  I've got the same responsibilities as before and ain't getting
more pay for this, so I really just want you to go away, but I have to at
least make it look like I'm going thru the motions in case someone looks
over these emails before I get laid off too."


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2009\05\20@114815 by John Coppens

flavicon
face
On Wed, 20 May 2009 11:11:50 -0400
.....olin_piclistKILLspamspam.....embedinc.com (Olin Lathrop) wrote:

> ... I've got the same responsibilities as before and ain't getting
> more pay for this, so I really just want you to go away, but I have to
> at least make it look like I'm going thru the motions in case someone
> looks over these emails before I get laid off too."

That's probably hitting it right on. I'm quite certain this guy isn't on
the payroll (is he the freelance deputy editor, or deputy freelance
editor?). I'm not even sure he'll get paid anything worthwhile for
getting prospective authors (judging from his lack of enthousiasm).

... and this attitude is actually quite typical for struggling
enterprises when the 'end-is-in-sight' depression is setting in. So maybe
they're just waiting for some heroe to write the mother-of-all-books or
-articles to save them.

John

> and I'm sure his "home office" has a phone

Yes, but I'm not sure an article can warrant transatlantic calls - profit
margins!

2009\05\20@121839 by Dr Skip

picon face
There is usually a required communication protocol with publishers (some say
protocol, others say game...). It probably stems from the days of few
publishers, before just in time publishing and electronic submission, when
investing in an author was expensive up front, and when the rest of the
population thought you could get rich and famous by writing something. Unless
you're world famous, or your agent presents your past work and does his job
(serious writers use agents - still), you don't just say "let's talk". You're
selling something. The famous author sells his ability to produce revenue as
shown by his track record. The rest sell a 'work'. You didn't offer a work. No
different than someone calling you and saying "Hi, I'm Jim and I know all sorts
of things. Let's get together and talk about all the stuff I can sell you some
time." You'd be much less kind to 'Jim' than Paul was to you I suspect. ;)

Maybe he's inundated with offers, just got back from a long trip pushing the
biz, or was on vacation (it IS almost Summer). He probably does work from home,
as is the 'green' way these days, and is used to having (from experience in the
office) illiterate bozos calling day and night wondering why their barely
readable manuscript hasn't been selected yet, and rightly doesn't want that
nonsense at home.

The note could also be translated thusly:

> Dear Olin,
This was nice, most don't even reply if you don't send something of substance.
<my comment, not translation>

>
>   Thanks for your interest in technical writing with Elektor.
>
>   I am the freelance deputy publisher for this activity, which is original
>   books.
I have to assume he's a noob since he he really hasn't thought this through,
probably doesn't know our business (which is really expected of authors before
they write the first letter), and since he's probably a nice guy, I'll be gentle.

>
>   The starting point would be a compelling title and a contents
>   index..which we ( you and me) could discuss for suitability for an
>   Elektor book.
I'm busy, but I'll make it short and sweet - tell him how this thing works
since he's new at this. Oops, better tell tell him what 'we' means, because as
a noob, he might think we'll (me and my colleagues) jump right on his title and
ooh and ah over it. I'm willing to help him refine it, but I've got work to do
and it isn't teaching every guy who thinks he's gonna get famous writing on how
to create a compelling title.

>
>   I look forward to your response
Standard response, but we'll see if he's got a clue or not. I certainly don't
have the time to spend countless hours dealing with a noob's ego and
cluelessness over the phone, so better just do this over email for a while. I
bet he doesn't come back though.

>
>   Best Wishes,
He may need it...
>
>   Paul

------
There are 2 ways of looking at it.... I've also been through the cycle, so I
wanted to share how it's seen from the other side.

I also want to add, after translating the later, that because the original
query (your note) was so vague, the person handling it first (the response
address) had trouble routing it to Paul. Maybe it got routed to the magazine
editor first (as you listed in your query), who rejected it as too noob. Maybe
Paul got it the day before (or of) and thought to ignore it too, but the next
day he had a moment free and is such a nice guy he thought he'd at least write
you something back. He quite possibly wrote it same day. You were treated
better than you would elsewhere!

The query letter had a lot of ego in it, which is typical for difficult to
handle would-be authors. I'm surprised there was a reply. In this relationship,
you aren't peers, this isn't a project meeting in the office, it's you selling
to him. He has every right to treat you as you'd treat some salesman knocking
at your door. I suspect you run salesmen through their 'hoops' too, either for
fun or to test their mettle. Engineers like to do that... ;) This time you're
the salesman and you got told to come back later when you have a real product
'we' may be interested in.

And even if they were having problems, it doesn't change the relationship. For
every magazine (you offered magazine article first), and book, it costs money
to print and invest in, and each could be the last if it contained a bunch of
bozo articles. Unless you're famous, and they are aware of your previous work
(like you would know what the HP or Tek salesman has generally to offer when he
shows up and you permit him an audience) you aren't ever going to be seen as
some white knight they need to 'discuss' anything with. Even if they're short
on authors, they can always go back to previous ones to write again. They'd
like to always find new ones, but the first weeding step is to toss the ones
that don't even know how to play.  That's just the way it is in that industry....


-Skip



Olin Lathrop wrote:
>
> I read it as "Some management bozo dreamed up this silly idea of asking
> people out there to write books.  I'm the poor schmuck stuck having to deal
> with the loosers that got laid off and now think they want to be writers
> because all the jobs bagging groceries or asking if you want fries with that
> are filled.  I've got the same responsibilities as before and ain't getting
> more pay for this, so I really just want you to go away, but I have to at
> least make it look like I'm going thru the motions in case someone looks
> over these emails before I get laid off too."

2009\05\20@134735 by olin piclist

face picon face
Dr Skip wrote:
> You didn't offer a work. No
> different than someone calling you and saying "Hi, I'm Jim and I know
> all sorts of things. Let's get together and talk about all the stuff
> I can sell you some time." You'd be much less kind to 'Jim' than Paul
> was to you I suspect. ;)

Yes I would be less kind to Jim because his call was unsolicited.  My query
wasn't since they specifically asked people to send them a message to that
particular address on the web site.

> Standard response, but we'll see if he's got a clue or not. I
> certainly don't have the time to spend countless hours dealing with a
> noob's ego and cluelessness over the phone, so better just do this
> over email for a while. I bet he doesn't come back though.

That sounds about right.

> You were treated better than you would elsewhere!

I have been elsewhere, so I know that's not true.

> In this relationship, you aren't peers, this isn't a project
> meeting in the office, it's you selling to him.

Maybe that is how he's looking at it, but then I'm not really interested
anyway.  I started out figuring this was a waste of time, but gave it a shot
to see what would happen.  I suppose you could take that as me abusing them.
On the other hand, I have written such things before and do know what I'm
talking about in regards to the subject matter.

> This time you're the salesman and you got told to come back later
> when you have a real product 'we' may be interested in.

That may be his attitude, but then they're missing some possible
opportunities.  I don't know what exactly they think the holes in their
offerings are, and what level and target audience they have in mind.  Quite
possibly they want me to pick something and then after its all nicely
delivered with a bow around it give it a thumbs up or thumbs down.  I have
no interest in that.  Just as it takes investment to create a new book or
article, it similarly takes investment to put together a proposal.  I was
willing to discuss with them what they wanted, see how it intersects with my
abilities, see if the business relationship would be worthwhile (I strongly
supsect it wouldn't have been), and then create the outline, abstract, or
whatever, already knowing they like the basic idea with the only question
being my excution of it.  That does take a working together peer to peer
mindset.  If they insist on the "us master, you lacky" attitude, then I have
no interest.  They are going to end up with the authors that are willing to
put up with that sort of crap, which aren't necessarily the ones that can
write the best articles or know the material best.

> For every magazine (you offered magazine article
> first),

No, I've done it both ways.  The articles I've offered were ones where there
was something in it for me to have it published, even without the pittance I
would get paid for it.  I've also had people specifically ask me to write on
a particular topic.  It does work both ways.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2009\05\20@144953 by Dr Skip

picon face
Just remember that for them to appreciate your offer, they have to know who you
are. You're note didn't offer anything that would give them that information
besides your self-certification of such. Typically, these guys get hundreds of
offers a month, maybe more, and every hobbyist or whatever pumps himself up to
sound like some expert. How's he supposed to know the real ones from the fakes?
By the work. That's usually by;

- submitting an article, based on your research of their market and what they
usually publish and their other writers' style, or

- submitting previous works or references to them so that they understand this
isn't your first time fishing and you _can_ write, or

- being well known enough (you're Steve Wozniak for instance) and sought after
in those circles, or

- you have the recommendation of someone they trust that you know your stuff.

I suspect that in every case where you had success before, you where not an
unknown quantity. Being 'asked' is proof of that. Publishers are _always_
looking, so just because you saw an ad doesn't change things. They still have
to weed out those that will waste their time.

The dialog might normally go with you asking for rates and terms they usually
pay for articles, a brief bio on yourself, and say something nice about their
mag (not in that order). _No different_ than any job interview... Consider
getting the attention of any decent size engineering company - what you wrote
wouldn't get anyone's attention either. Either impress them with your skills by
reference, or have someone do it for you from the inside. Publishing is no
different. They'll give you their rates and maybe some feedback on whether your
background fits what they're looking for. It will be cordial, but pretty form-like.

After that, decide if there's anything worthwhile. If so, suggest something,
and if you haven't written for them before and they have no other visible work
of yours to look at, write a page or two so they see your style. You can still
be a great engineer and author but not be able to address their audience in the
right way... They need and want to know that. Even in a job application you
list your experience _details_ and career, and both professional references and
implied references by the companies that have employed you. Same as if you're
applying as a contractor to write some code for someone. They screen applicants
before inviting the select few in to interview.

Then, you can get intimate with them and 'discuss'. Now imagine a job where you
have to get the mag out, have several books going, AND have hundreds of people
writing to you every month saying "I'm a great guy and think we can do great
things. Let's talk". It's still just you saying you're great, no matter how you
word it. Eventually, you will run into people and places who don't know how
great you are in advance, so getting good at selling yourself is a good skill
to have. ;)

There isn't enough time for them to teach everyone. Their best person for the
job knows their side of the story, makes their job easy, writes well and to
their audience, and _usually_ writes because they like to write or are
successful at writing. That means they write (create) based on their (the
writer's) 'market research' and then sell it. Where the subject authors might
be less experienced in the business vs popular presses (as these kind of pubs),
they are usually willing to do a little more hand-holding, but they usually
only have the time to do a little. The next guy in his inbox may only need 30
minutes of total interaction for an article, or have worked with him before and
it was good, where you as an unknown may end up taking a week of hand-holding
to get the same product to him. He has to play the probabilities (and your
approach tells him where you are in the experience continuum) without any other
info at hand.

You got the book guy's attention. Go send him some past work. Tell him what you
think will sell (he knows he's not omniscient, but he does have opinions and is
the 'project manager' in this case). Send him a resume. Offer some range of
flexibility in what you feel good about writing (but don't argue about how he
doesn't know squat about the market if he tries to 'alter' your focus). I'd bet
he gets hundreds of vague letters a month and he sends as many similar replies
as he can, but the bet is you'll go away without a clue. One or two a year may
actually get their 'stuff' in order and go back. THAT'S who they want to spend
the real time with... Go be one of them!

-Skip


Olin Lathrop wrote:

> No, I've done it both ways.  The articles I've offered were ones where there
> was something in it for me to have it published, even without the pittance I
> would get paid for it.  I've also had people specifically ask me to write on
> a particular topic.  It does work both ways.

2009\05\20@150153 by Bob Blick

face
flavicon
face
On Wed, 20 May 2009 08:28:10 -0400, "Olin Lathrop"
<EraseMEolin_piclistspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTembedinc.com> said:

> It looks like way too much trouble just to find out whether there is
> anything worth persuing here.  I've got plenty of guaranteed gainful and
> interesting work to keep me busy that spending this much effort on
> something
> with such a low probability of usefulness isn't worth it.  Screw this.

There's an old saying that has had a few revisions, one of which seems
applicable: "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. Those who can't
teach, write." Not to say that this is universally true, and no offense
to the teachers and writers, but there are a lot of people who think
they can write. So the editors of any magazine have to deal with a lot
of writers. And even something that is well-written may not fit with the
requirements the editor has to deal with, and it's natural for them to
be a little aloof.

Sooner or later an editor will seek you out, then you'll have the high
ground. That's the time you might want to consider writing.

Cheerful regards,

Bob

--
http://www.fastmail.fm - Faster than the air-speed velocity of an
                         unladen european swallow

2009\05\20@150704 by cdb

flavicon
face


:: sent them a email
:: message using the address on their web page.

Did you email the new US website or the European one?

The UK one took about 10 days to reply to an article submission about
6 years ago.

I can say that a US publisher 5 years ago payed a maximum of US$750
for no more than three pages, with deductions for any editing work
they had to do -they deducted $50.00 from me due to the heresy of
having to take out my 'U's and substitute 'Z's instead of 'S' in some
words (though I'm sure colour and defence would have been understood).
Anyhow you do have to wait for three months after publication before
getting paid.

The payment has been decreased, they now pay about $450.00. Special
articles, series and those of more than an agreed 3 pages are by a
different rate.

Colin
--
cdb, colinspamspam_OUTbtech-online.co.uk on 21/05/2009

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2009\05\20@152225 by olin piclist

face picon face
Dr Skip wrote:
> You got the book guy's attention. Go send him some past work. Tell
> him what you think will sell (he knows he's not omniscient, but he
> does have opinions and is the 'project manager' in this case). Send
> him a resume. Offer some range of flexibility in what you feel good
> about writing (but don't argue about how he doesn't know squat about
> the market if he tries to 'alter' your focus). I'd bet
> he gets hundreds of vague letters a month and he sends as many
> similar replies
> as he can, but the bet is you'll go away without a clue. One or two a
> year may actually get their 'stuff' in order and go back. THAT'S who
> they want to spend
> the real time with... Go be one of them!

Your explanation makes sense and your advice sounds good if I really wanted
to do this badly enough.  However, I've got plenty of far more profitable
things to do.  While writing a occasional article can be fun and also get
you a kind of exposure different from your normal activities, it's not worth
all that.  I'm not exactly hard up looking for work.  Just as he wants
things made easy for him because he's got a lot of other stuff to do, so do
I.  If that means it doesn't work out, then it doesn't work out.  No big
deal on my end.


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2009\05\20@152551 by olin piclist

face picon face
cdb wrote:
> Did you email the new US website or the European one?

I sent it so @spam@publisher_englishKILLspamspamelektor.com, which was what was listed on the
web page soliciting for authors.


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(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

2009\05\20@171536 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
You might be right, Olin, it might not be worth the effort.

- ------

I think kinky stories are the wave of the future. I guess I'll have to
ask my wife if she
knows any....

--Bob

On 5/20/09, Olin Lathrop <KILLspamolin_piclistKILLspamspamembedinc.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

> -

2009\05\20@231429 by Dave Lag

picon face
Olin Lathrop wrote:
> Dr Skip wrote:
>

>>Standard response, but we'll see if he's got a clue or not. I
>>certainly don't have the time to spend countless hours dealing with a
>>noob's ego and cluelessness over the phone, so better just do this
>>over email for a while. I bet he doesn't come back though.

Interesting,

I wrote a complaint email about an article and the editor
Jan-Something-IIRC wrote me back in short order.

If I wanted to write for them I would go through Ed Dell of Audioxpress
(Audio Amateur)/Old Colony Sound Labs who appear to be fronting the
"rag" in North America.

Dave

2009\05\20@232815 by Benjamin Grant

flavicon
face
In response to Bob.. I agree there may be a large number of people that do
think they can write, but I'd argue that truly being a clear, informative
writer is a rare skill, particularly in the technology realm.  Even
published articles are often filled with jargon, use poor examples and
figures and lack fundamental skills key to successful writing. Again, I'm
not arguing with you, there are a lot of people who feel they can write, I'm
just maintaining that being an actually good scientific writer is
nontrivial.

2009\05\21@130657 by Gerhard Fiedler

picon face
John Coppens wrote:

> Yes, but I'm not sure an article can warrant transatlantic calls -
> profit margins!

At 2 cents per minute or less -- if they can't afford this, they're
toast anyway :)

Gerhard

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