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PICList Thread
'[OT] Employment tests'
2009\04\15@165915 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Chris Smolinski wrote:
> >This is completely off topic, but may I ask how you came to that
> >conclusion?
>>I'm an engineer and a manager, and I've interviewed close to 100 people
>>over
>>our 7 years in business, using interview questions and tests that we
>>ourselves put together. And yes, many of the questions came from the books
>>I've read, on hiring and management.
>
> One company I worked for, we had a test that we gave to prospective
> engineering and technician candidates. It contained mostly "basic"
> material. I still remember one of the questions, it concerned diodes.
> It had several figures, each containing a diode and resistor, and a
> sine wave input, you had to draw the output. Really basic stuff. But
> you'd be amazed how many people didn't know the correct answers. We
> found that it was an excellent way to filter out duds.

Same here. A while back, I posted an old electronic technician test here,
and many people commented that it was "too easy". However, out of all the
applicants that we administered the test to, only one candidate got 100%.

If someone cannot apply Ohm's law to a resistor network, it is a good
indicator that they will not understand more complex circuits. Moreover, we
found that people who spent more time on the test, generally did poorer than
the ones who finished it quickly.

Tests are a great supplement to interview questions. Some people can breeze
through the interview, only to fail the test.

Vitaliy

2009\04\15@170932 by Chris Smolinski

flavicon
face
>If someone cannot apply Ohm's law to a resistor network, it is a good
>indicator that they will not understand more complex circuits. Moreover, we
>found that people who spent more time on the test, generally did poorer than
>the ones who finished it quickly.

In my junior year EE lab, I still remember one of the experiments, it
was a digital circuit using TTL chips. My lab partner (who had pretty
close to a 4.0 average) was all upset. He had done the calculations
on the current required by all the chips (100 mA total or whatever).
The power supply was 5V rated at 3A. He was concerned because the
supply would force 3A though the circuit, damaging the chips.

True story.


--

---
Chris Smolinski
Black Cat Systems
http://www.blackcatsystems.com

2009\04\15@172428 by Herbert Graf

picon face
On Wed, 2009-04-15 at 17:09 -0400, Chris Smolinski wrote:
> >If someone cannot apply Ohm's law to a resistor network, it is a good
> >indicator that they will not understand more complex circuits. Moreover, we
> >found that people who spent more time on the test, generally did poorer than
> >the ones who finished it quickly.
>
> In my junior year EE lab, I still remember one of the experiments, it
> was a digital circuit using TTL chips. My lab partner (who had pretty
> close to a 4.0 average) was all upset. He had done the calculations
> on the current required by all the chips (100 mA total or whatever).
> The power supply was 5V rated at 3A. He was concerned because the
> supply would force 3A though the circuit, damaging the chips.

Similar situation, 4th year, one of the final EE labs (I think it was an
analog electronics course), a few people came to me, VERY smart people,
asking which side of a diode was the cathode...

It's not like they hadn't seen a diode before, we had multiple prior
labs that did. The difference this time was the project was an
individual assignment.

Another course I had in 4th year required that the final multi-week lab
assignment was soldered together, I thought that was a good idea. An EE
should at least have some familiarity with how to solder.

TTYL

2009\04\15@173714 by Chris Smolinski

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face
>Another course I had in 4th year required that the final multi-week lab
>assignment was soldered together, I thought that was a good idea. An EE
>should at least have some familiarity with how to solder.

More than once, I suggested the "final question" to a job candidate
was to toss them a hot soldering iron, and see which end they grab :-)

--

---
Chris Smolinski
Black Cat Systems
http://www.blackcatsystems.com

2009\04\15@212454 by Neil Cherry

flavicon
face
Where I work the testing is really tough. Because I work in a network
lab the basic questions are layer 1, layer 2, layer 3 and some layer
4 (OSI layers) and general networking questions. We had a lot of
certified network engineers who couldn't follow a the packet down
the stack and through the network (explain arp, explain when a frame
is used, when a packet ...). Often it wasn't the one who had the most
credentials that was selected but rather those who knew the basics
and who were willing to learn. An open mind is a wondrous thing.
Those who got an attitude were almost immediately ignored, though
we had a real hard nose Russian gentleman who was smart as a whip.
But if you weren't on your toes he would get in your face.

Know your basics and be flexible and you can go far.

BTW, I'd probably fail half the tests you guys are talking about
because I work on a varied selection of subjects on a daily
basis. I can't keep all this information in my head but the
basics will point me in the correct direct and then I usually
know where to look for specifics.

--
Linux Home Automation         Neil Cherry       spam_OUTncherryTakeThisOuTspamlinuxha.com
http://www.linuxha.com/                         Main site
http://linuxha.blogspot.com/                    My HA Blog
Author of:            Linux Smart Homes For Dummies

2009\04\16@002633 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Apr 15, 2009, at 2:24 PM, Herbert Graf wrote:

> Similar situation, 4th year, one of the final EE labs (I think it  
> was an analog electronics course), a few people came to me, VERY  
> smart people, asking which side of a diode was the cathode...

I dunno.  I've heard that it's very rare to have a SW engineering  
applicant be able to write out an error-free example of some common  
algorithm (say, a binary search.)  In some ways, that's a bit sad.  On  
the other hand, I personally hardly ever even TRY to get perfect code  
the first time; the compiler will find my missing semicolons or  
misspelled keywords in a lot less time than it would have taken me to  
be anal about them in the first place.  The idea that code has to be  
completely correct before you try it out dates back to the days when  
it was going to take hours and cost "real money" to have your card  
deck scheduled through the chain of steps it took to actually run it...

BillW

2009\04\16@005542 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Thu, Apr 16, 2009 at 12:26 PM, William "Chops" Westfield
<.....westfwKILLspamspam@spam@mac.com> wrote:
>
> On Apr 15, 2009, at 2:24 PM, Herbert Graf wrote:
>
>> Similar situation, 4th year, one of the final EE labs (I think it
>> was an analog electronics course), a few people came to me, VERY
>> smart people, asking which side of a diode was the cathode...
>
> I dunno.  I've heard that it's very rare to have a SW engineering
> applicant be able to write out an error-free example of some common
> algorithm (say, a binary search.)

I am not a software guy but I think these two situations are
different. I will accept the 2nd type but not the first type ;-)
I was a TA for a 4th year lab in a top tier public US university
and I was a bit shocked at the first two labs. But through
hard work (mine and their), they finally was able to put up a
boost converter using SG3524.

Back in my time, we had to solder a 10W audio amplifier
in the analog electronic lab (two to three sessions) and a
fully-functional functional generator (or an AM/FM radio)
with less integrated circuits for the 1 week design course.

On the other hand, the time is different now. The kids now have
many things to play. 10 or 20 years back, there are not so
many things to learn as now. Internet/Games can both
be good knowledge base or big distractions. And the new
generation students do have wider knowledge domains
(even though may be less dept) than my time.

--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

2009\04\16@012949 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> a few people came to me, VERY smart people,
> asking which side of a diode was the cathode...

Probably not comparable, but I still don't remember and probably never
will. I know the band corresponds to the line-side in the symbol, and I
know which way the current flows. That's all I need.

To recall which side is the cathode I have to go through a mental
process: Cathode. There used to be cold-cathode tubes. So the default
cathode was warm. So that's where they boiled the electrons. So that was
the negative side. Current flows towards the electrons-side, so the
cathode is the band. Amazingly, I get the process right about 50% of the
time.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2009\04\16@042452 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>In my junior year EE lab, I still remember one of the experiments,
>it was a digital circuit using TTL chips. My lab partner (who had
>pretty close to a 4.0 average) was all upset. He had done the
>calculations on the current required by all the chips (100 mA total
>or whatever). The power supply was 5V rated at 3A. He was concerned
>because the supply would force 3A though the circuit, damaging the
>chips.
>
>True story.

Shades of another true story, that I may have told here before.

Graduate fresh from university decides he needs to measure the source
impedance of the mains supply, so puts Avo 8 Multimeter on 'Ohms' range, and
plugs probes into mains socket. Proceeds to wonder why there is an almighty
bang inside his nice new meter, that no longer works, and is a write off.

Told to me by someone who witnessed the event happen ...

2009\04\16@045107 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>>Another course I had in 4th year required that the final multi-week
>>lab assignment was soldered together, I thought that was a good idea.
>>An EE should at least have some familiarity with how to solder.
>
>More than once, I suggested the "final question" to a job candidate
>was to toss them a hot soldering iron, and see which end they grab :-)

<VBG>.

In the latter years of working for the company I did my apprenticeship with,
I worked with the guy who got the task of sorting the prospective intake for
new apprenticeships. He got to a point where he gave them two tests as well
as an interview. One test was a basic electronics test - draw a crystal set,
identify component symbols, etc, to see if they had at least played with
electronics in any way as a hobby, and the other test was a basic secondary
school level maths test, as it became evident that the level of maths
learning they were attaining was pretty horrible.

When I interviewed for my current position, there were two or three
technical people (well all minimum degree based, some with doctorates) on
the interview panel (as well as a couple of HR people), and I beat off
people with masters degrees - because I had the experience to answer the
technical questions, like sketch an analogue amplifier built around an IC
amplifier block, when and why do you use twisted pair wiring, if you feed a
pulse into a coax that is open circuit at the other end, what signal do you
see at the driving end, all basic questions which required answers learnt
early in my career, some through experience, some from book learning. But
the fresh from university applicants didn't have the experience backing to
answer these in a manner that was convincing to the panel.

And my feeling is this is where solarwind will find the going tough, he will
come out of university with a heap of book learning, and come crashing down
from a great height as he comes up against this requirement for experience.

2009\04\16@063535 by Ruben Jönsson

flavicon
face
>
> And my feeling is this is where solarwind will find the going tough, he will
> come out of university with a heap of book learning, and come crashing down from
> a great height as he comes up against this requirement for experience.
>

Maybe, but I think he is definitely on the right path, experience wise here. I
mean he is a member of Piclist, he has started to tinker with pics, electronic
circuits in general and even making his own circuitboards. This experience
together with the "book learning" he will acquire in university will certainly
get him a long way.

/Ruben

==============================
Ruben Jönsson
AB Liros Electronic
Box 9124, 200 39 Malmö, Sweden
TEL INT +46 40142078
FAX INT +46 40947388
rubenspamKILLspampp.sbbs.se
==============================

2009\04\16@082157 by Lee Jones

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face
>> An EE should at least have some familiarity with how to solder.

> More than once, I suggested the "final question" to a job candidate
> was to toss them a hot soldering iron, and see which end they grab :-)

"Dumb" candidate will grab either end -- so 50% may "get it right".

Newbie "smart" candidate will grab the handle or the cord.

Experienced "smart" candidate will move out of the way and let it
fall -- they have the scar(s) showing prior lessons learned. :-)

Many many years ago, when through-hole was de rigueur, I dropped
a large circuit board.  I tried to catch it and all those sharp
little legs left dozens of bleeding cuts.  Next time, I knew to
let the board fall.

                                               Lee Jones

2009\04\16@093052 by Isaac Marino Bavaresco

flavicon
face
Alan B. Pearce escreveu:
>> In my junior year EE lab, I still remember one of the experiments,
>> it was a digital circuit using TTL chips. My lab partner (who had
>> pretty close to a 4.0 average) was all upset. He had done the
>> calculations on the current required by all the chips (100 mA total
>> or whatever). The power supply was 5V rated at 3A. He was concerned
>> because the supply would force 3A though the circuit, damaging the
>> chips.
>>
>> True story.
>>    
>
> Shades of another true story, that I may have told here before.
>
> Graduate fresh from university decides he needs to measure the source
> impedance of the mains supply, so puts Avo 8 Multimeter on 'Ohms' range, and
> plugs probes into mains socket. Proceeds to wonder why there is an almighty
> bang inside his nice new meter, that no longer works, and is a write off.
>
> Told to me by someone who witnessed the event happen ...
>  
When I was a teacher in a public technical high-school here in Brazil,
it was common for first year students try to "measure" the current of
the wall outlet with a multimeter.

We had heaps of fused meters stored in a locker.

I think it keeps happening...

Regards,

Isaac

__________________________________________________
Faça ligações para outros computadores com o novo Yahoo! Messenger
http://br.beta.messenger.yahoo.com/

2009\04\16@093557 by Chris Smolinski

flavicon
face
>Alan B. Pearce escreveu:
>  > Graduate fresh from university decides he needs to measure the source
>>  impedance of the mains supply, so puts Avo 8 Multimeter on 'Ohms' range, and
>>  plugs probes into mains socket. Proceeds to wonder why there is an almighty
>>  bang inside his nice new meter, that no longer works, and is a write off.
>>
>  > Told to me by someone who witnessed the event happen ...

Several ex-military techs I know said that a common hazing experience
for the newbies was to give them a box of crystals to "test", the
tester was a small box with terminals connected directed to 120 VAC
:-)

--

---
Chris Smolinski
Black Cat Systems
http://www.blackcatsystems.com

2009\04\16@101900 by Tamas Rudnai

face picon face
I still remember to one of the fresh graduate measuring the 50ohm cable with
a multimeter. He said the cable is wrong, it is not 50 ohms one at all...

Tamas


On Thu, Apr 16, 2009 at 2:35 PM, Chris Smolinski <
.....csmolinskiKILLspamspam.....blackcatsystems.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2009\04\16@102502 by William Couture

face picon face
On Wed, Apr 15, 2009 at 4:58 PM, Vitaliy <EraseMEspamspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTmaksimov.org> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

My company recently hired a contract programmer to do a project that we
didn't have time/resources to do.  So we did several interviews.

One candidate wasn't doing very well, but tried to hide it by talking a lot.

So, I asked him a "nonsense" question.  He did not realize that it was
nonsense, and tried to B***S*** his way through it.

Needless to say, someone else got the job.

Bill

--
Psst...  Hey, you... Buddy...  Want a kitten?  straycatblues.petfinder.org

2009\04\16@124313 by Tony Smith

flavicon
face
> I still remember to one of the fresh graduate measuring the 50ohm cable
with
> a multimeter. He said the cable is wrong, it is not 50 ohms one at all...
>
> Tamas


That's because he measured the short one.

Tony

2009\04\16@142223 by Herbert Graf

picon face
On Wed, 2009-04-15 at 21:26 -0700, William "Chops" Westfield wrote:
> On Apr 15, 2009, at 2:24 PM, Herbert Graf wrote:
>
> > Similar situation, 4th year, one of the final EE labs (I think it  
> > was an analog electronics course), a few people came to me, VERY  
> > smart people, asking which side of a diode was the cathode...
>
> I dunno.  I've heard that it's very rare to have a SW engineering  
> applicant be able to write out an error-free example of some common  
> algorithm (say, a binary search.)  In some ways, that's a bit sad.  On  
> the other hand, I personally hardly ever even TRY to get perfect code  
> the first time; the compiler will find my missing semicolons or  
> misspelled keywords in a lot less time than it would have taken me to  
> be anal about them in the first place.  The idea that code has to be  
> completely correct before you try it out dates back to the days when  
> it was going to take hours and cost "real money" to have your card  
> deck scheduled through the chain of steps it took to actually run it...

I'm not sure why you are responding to my message with this. FWIW I
agree, I never try to write code to be "100% perfect" off hand, that's
what the compiler is for. My boss has a favourite saying: let the tool
do the work.

OTOH, for a 4th year EE just about to graduate not to know which side of
a diode is a cathode was very disturbing to me. These WEREN'T CEs, these
were EEs who had been exposed to diodes in 1st year labs.

TTYL

2009\04\16@142515 by Herbert Graf

picon face
On Thu, 2009-04-16 at 07:29 +0200, Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> > a few people came to me, VERY smart people,
> > asking which side of a diode was the cathode...
>
> Probably not comparable, but I still don't remember and probably never
> will. I know the band corresponds to the line-side in the symbol, and I
> know which way the current flows. That's all I need.
>
> To recall which side is the cathode I have to go through a mental
> process: Cathode. There used to be cold-cathode tubes. So the default
> cathode was warm. So that's where they boiled the electrons. So that was
> the negative side. Current flows towards the electrons-side, so the
> cathode is the band. Amazingly, I get the process right about 50% of the
> time.

You are right, the word "cathode" isn't important here, I don't think of
"cathodes" either. The point was these students couldn't match the
schematic symbols orientation with that of the physical diode. They used
the word cathode because that's how they saw the symbol.

So, let me rephrase: I think it very disturbing that an EE in 4th year,
right about to graduate, can't match the pins of a diode with it's
schematic symbol.

TTYL

2009\04\16@142658 by Herbert Graf

picon face
On Thu, 2009-04-16 at 09:25 +0100, Alan B. Pearce wrote:
> >In my junior year EE lab, I still remember one of the experiments,
> >it was a digital circuit using TTL chips. My lab partner (who had
> >pretty close to a 4.0 average) was all upset. He had done the
> >calculations on the current required by all the chips (100 mA total
> >or whatever). The power supply was 5V rated at 3A. He was concerned
> >because the supply would force 3A though the circuit, damaging the
> >chips.
> >
> >True story.
>
> Shades of another true story, that I may have told here before.
>
> Graduate fresh from university decides he needs to measure the source
> impedance of the mains supply, so puts Avo 8 Multimeter on 'Ohms' range, and
> plugs probes into mains socket. Proceeds to wonder why there is an almighty
> bang inside his nice new meter, that no longer works, and is a write off.

When I was probably younger then 10 years old I used my brand new
digital multimeter to measure the amount of current a wall socket can
produce. Fortunately the range I used was fused and no fireworks
occurred, but it took me a while to understand why that idea didn't
work! :)

TTYL

2009\04\16@145538 by Rolf

flavicon
face
Herbert Graf wrote:
> When I was probably younger then 10 years old I used my brand new
> digital multimeter to measure the amount of current a wall socket can
> produce. Fortunately the range I used was fused and no fireworks
> occurred, but it took me a while to understand why that idea didn't
> work! :)
>
> TTYL
>
>  
I find I kept/keep learning that lesson.... Somehow I seem to have the
meter on the wrong setting at the wrong time... actually, that's not
true, I change the meter to measure volts, but don't plug the cable in
the the 'V' socket but leave it in the 'A' socket... hence I blow a fuse.

I have learned two tricks / two solutions....
1. have multiple meters... 3, in fact. One 'good' one dedicated to
'precision' Amps (electronics), one 'good' one dedicated to precision
non-amp measures, and one cheap one for general household usage.
2. keep spare fuses on hand.

Rolf

2009\04\16@150204 by John Ferrell

face picon face
I think it was Ben Franklin who said "It is better to remain silent and have
others think you are a fool than to speak and remove all doubt,"

John Ferrell  W8CCW

"All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing." -- Edmund Burke
...."The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other
people's money."
  MARGARET THATCHER
http://DixieNC.US

2009\04\16@152110 by cdb

flavicon
face


:::: More than once, I suggested the "final question" to a job
:::: candidate
:::: was to toss them a hot soldering iron, and see which end they
:::: grab

Wouldn't that be against 'elf-n-safety' rules?

What would I get for just letting it drop on the floor?

Colin
--
cdb, colinspamspam_OUTbtech-online.co.uk on 17/04/2009

Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk  

Hosted by:  http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=7988359







2009\04\16@153248 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
>> a few people came to me, VERY smart people,
>> asking which side of a diode was the cathode...
>
> Probably not comparable, but I still don't remember and probably never
> will. I know the band corresponds to the line-side in the symbol, and I
> know which way the current flows. That's all I need.
>
> To recall which side is the cathode I have to go through a mental
> process: Cathode. There used to be cold-cathode tubes. So the default
> cathode was warm. So that's where they boiled the electrons. So that was
> the negative side. Current flows towards the electrons-side, so the
> cathode is the band. Amazingly, I get the process right about 50% of the
> time.

Wouter, you keep bringing this up... memorize it already! :)

Considering how much other stuff you keep stored in your mental attic, I
think it's a shame not to remember the basic stuff that we all expect first
year EE students to know.

Vitaliy

2009\04\16@160753 by Jinx

face picon face

>> To recall which side is the cathode

Wouter, it's very simple. With the diode pointing to the left the
symbol makes a 'K' at the cathode end

--K|---

With the diode pointing up, it's kind of an 'A' at the anode end

|
_
^
|

Or the way I used to remember it, until I noticed the above. With
'positive' flow, 'a' comes before 'k' (or 'c'). IOW voltage sees 'a'
before 'k'

2009\04\16@161657 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
>> (about hich side is the cathode)
>
> Wouter, you keep bringing this up... memorize it already! :)
>
> Considering how much other stuff you keep stored in your mental attic, I
> think it's a shame not to remember the basic stuff that we all expect first
> year EE students to know.

I certainly won't, and I don't expect anyone else to do so. The only
situation where I need to remember this (apart from babbling on this
list) is when I must choose between CC and CA LED displays. So I keep my
mental attic (which is rather leaky) for other stuff!

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2009\04\16@174058 by Ruben Jönsson

flavicon
face
{Quote hidden}

My Fluke meter makes a noise and indicates LEADS when the leads are put in the
A or mA/uA terminals and the meter is set for V (or another high resistance
measuring setting) or the wrong A range. I guess this has saved me some fuses
and/or circuits.

/Ruben

/Ruben==============================
Ruben Jönsson
AB Liros Electronic
Box 9124, 200 39 Malmö, Sweden
TEL INT +46 40142078
FAX INT +46 40947388
@spam@rubenKILLspamspampp.sbbs.se
==============================

2009\04\16@174438 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
John Ferrell wrote:
>I think it was Ben Franklin who said "It is better to remain silent and
>have
> others think you are a fool than to speak and remove all doubt,"
>

Somewhat off-topic, I was talking to a tech who came to diagnose our DSL
line problem once, and asked him why he thought it was a bad idea to have it
split into two lines (each heading off to a different part of the office).
Being an expert, he explained it to me in layman's terms: it is because the
signal goes all the way up one line, then comes back, "gets confused" and
doesn't go down the second line. So that's why we're having problems with
our DSL service, we just need to disconnect the west line so the signal
doesn't get confused.


2009\04\16@180004 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Wouter van Ooijen wrote:
> >> (about hich side is the cathode)
> >
>> Wouter, you keep bringing this up... memorize it already! :)
>>
>> Considering how much other stuff you keep stored in your mental attic, I
>> think it's a shame not to remember the basic stuff that we all expect
>> first
>> year EE students to know.
>
> I certainly won't, and I don't expect anyone else to do so. The only
> situation where I need to remember this (apart from babbling on this
> list) is when I must choose between CC and CA LED displays. So I keep my
> mental attic (which is rather leaky) for other stuff!

Lots of things (not just diodes) have cathodes. I first learned about them
at the age of 12, when I was playing with vacuum tubes, and most people
learn about cathodes in high school physics (X-ray, electrolysis, etc).
You're very intelligent, way more intelligent than me (I'm not a professor,
and I don't work on space stuff), but if I didn't know you and you said you
didn't know that "cathode" means "the negative terminal", you would make a
bad first impression.

IMO, you're just being stubborn for no good reason (out of spite?).

On "the mental attic": IIRC it was Sherlock Holmes who had this theory that
the mind is like an attic where you put stuff, and at some point it "fills
up" to the point where you can't put anything else in, or find the stuff you
need. AFAIK modern science says the opposite: the more you train your brain,
the better it gets.

Vitaliy

2009\04\16@181128 by peter green

flavicon
face

> Somewhat off-topic, I was talking to a tech who came to diagnose our DSL
> line problem once, and asked him why he thought it was a bad idea to have it
> split into two lines (each heading off to a different part of the office).
> Being an expert, he explained it to me in layman's terms: it is because the
> signal goes all the way up one line, then comes back, "gets confused" and
> doesn't go down the second line. So that's why we're having problems with
> our DSL service, we just need to disconnect the west line so the signal
> doesn't get confused
While the details aren't quite right the priciple that splits are bad is
a sound one.

What will actually happen at a split is that part of the signal will go
down each side of the split and there will also be a reflection back
towards the signal source. When the signal reaches the end of the
unterminated branch it will reflect back and hit the branch point again.
At this point there will be more splits and reflections.

The result is the signal that reaches the DSL modem will be a mixture of
the original signal and various reflections of it. DSL is designed to
tollerate reflections to some degree but still unncessacery branches are
best avoided.

2009\04\16@183227 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Lots of things (not just diodes) have cathodes. I first learned about them
> at the age of 12, when I was playing with vacuum tubes, and most people
> learn about cathodes in high school physics (X-ray, electrolysis, etc).

But I am not likely to encounter those things, so why bother? I can
match a circuit symbol with the physical thingy, in nearly all cases
that is all I need. (But I will try to remember the -K|- idea). I'd
rather fill my mental attic with stuff I am more likely to need, like
the details of the Cortex-M3 instruction set.

> You're very intelligent, way more intelligent than me (I'm not a professor,
> and I don't work on space stuff)

I would not know that, an some people argue that intelligence is a
circular property :) And professor is another word (ilke engineer) that
can have different meanings; I am certainly not a professor in the Dutch
sense. I just teach some subjects (in most cases the 'teaching' part is
much more challenging for me that the 'subject' part).

> but if I didn't know you and you said you
> didn't know that "cathode" means "the negative terminal", you would make a
> bad first impression.
> IMO, you're just being stubborn for no good reason (out of spite?).

I am often stubborn just for stubborns sake. But like to think that I
will yield to a good argumentation. But in that case I am the judge for
the 'goodness'...

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2009\04\16@190447 by Philip Pemberton

face
flavicon
face
cdb wrote:
> Wouldn't that be against 'elf-n-safety' rules?

OK, then. Yell "Catch!" and toss them a cold soldering iron. With no tip
(could poke an eye out). Or element (could be hot). Or cable (bare wires are
dangerous, y'know).

So pretty much yell "Catch!" and throw them the plastic handle.

> What would I get for just letting it drop on the floor?

The bill. :)

--
Phil.
KILLspampiclistKILLspamspamphilpem.me.uk
http://www.philpem.me.uk/

2009\04\16@192018 by Michael Algernon

flavicon
face
Toss them a rubber soldering iron.
MA

{Quote hidden}

2009\04\16@193140 by Philip Pemberton

face
flavicon
face
Michael Algernon wrote:
> Toss them a rubber soldering iron.
> MA

I can see it now... A brand-new type of chew-toy for canine (and feline?)
engineers.

:)

--
Phil.
spamBeGonepiclistspamBeGonespamphilpem.me.uk
http://www.philpem.me.uk/

2009\04\16@214429 by Jinx

face picon face
> Toss them a rubber soldering iron

Not sure where you'd get one of those. You can get things
that *look* like rubber soldering irons of course. If slightly
bulkier. But I'd not be throwing something like that at an
interviewee

2009\04\17@010008 by William \Chops\ Westfield

face picon face

On Apr 16, 2009, at 12:05 PM, John Ferrell wrote:

>  think it was Ben Franklin who said "It is better to remain silent  
> and have
> others think you are a fool than to speak and remove all doubt,"

OTOH, I consider it one of my good points that I'm willing to ask the  
"simple" questions that everyone else is too embarrassed to admit they  
don't know the
answer to...

BillW

2009\04\17@011831 by Xiaofan Chen

face picon face
On Fri, Apr 17, 2009 at 12:59 PM, William "Chops" Westfield
<TakeThisOuTwestfwEraseMEspamspam_OUTmac.com> wrote:
>
> On Apr 16, 2009, at 12:05 PM, John Ferrell wrote:
>
>>  think it was Ben Franklin who said "It is better to remain silent
>> and have others think you are a fool than to speak and remove
>> all doubt,"

IMHO that would be very good points for some pop stars or similar,
but not engineers...

> OTOH, I consider it one of my good points that I'm willing to ask the
> "simple" questions that everyone else is too embarrassed to admit they
> don't know the answer to...

I think it is really a good point! Sometimes actually this kind of
"simple" questions can sparkle much deeper thoughts.

--
Xiaofan http://mcuee.blogspot.com

2009\04\17@012303 by Benjamin Grant

flavicon
face
Not that I have nearly as much experience in interviews/interviewing as most
of you but I found that's a really good point about being willing to ask
questions. It was really amusing when all of us(PhD recruits/interviewees)
would be out at dinner pretending to know exactly what a professor was
talking about. The second he was gone everyone was asking each other what on
earth he said -- and none of us knew the answer. Very juvenile, I admit, but
perhaps a natural tendency?

On Fri, Apr 17, 2009 at 1:18 AM, Xiaofan Chen <RemoveMExiaofancspamTakeThisOuTgmail.com> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2009\04\17@015651 by Jinx

face picon face
> OTOH, I consider it one of my good points that I'm willing to
> ask the "simple" questions that everyone else is too embarrassed
> to admit they don't know the answer to...

Oh yeah. Guys do that a lot. "I'd rather stuff it up than ask"

2009\04\17@040637 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>My Fluke meter makes a noise and indicates LEADS when the leads
>are put in the A or mA/uA terminals and the meter is set for V
>(or another high resistance measuring setting) or the wrong A range.
>I guess this has saved me some fuses and/or circuits.

Mine do too - I just wish they would wait long enough (like about 5 seconds)
before beeping - 'I'm in the middle of changing them, you stupid meter' ...

2009\04\17@074919 by Dave Joyce

flavicon
face
On Fri, 2009-04-17 at 17:55 +1200, Jinx wrote:
> > OTOH, I consider it one of my good points that I'm willing to
> > ask the "simple" questions that everyone else is too embarrassed
> > to admit they don't know the answer to...
>
> Oh yeah. Guys do that a lot. "I'd rather stuff it up than ask"

I always tell my apprentices "There is no such thing as a stupid
question". This of course needs to be taken in context with the subject
being discussed.
As an experienced diesel mechanic, I would much rather someone ask me a
question instead of making that mistake. EG: I had an apprentice change
gearbox oil in a truck, he put the wrong grade oil in, if the truck went
out it would have blown the gearbox costing several thousand dollars. He
didn't ask the seemingly stupid question. I had to ask him what oil he
put in. So in my 2 cents worth, it is infinitely better to ask a silly
question rather than stuffing something up :)

2009\04\17@084406 by Neil Cherry

flavicon
face
Dave Joyce wrote:
> On Fri, 2009-04-17 at 17:55 +1200, Jinx wrote:
>>> OTOH, I consider it one of my good points that I'm willing to
>>> ask the "simple" questions that everyone else is too embarrassed
>>> to admit they don't know the answer to...
>> Oh yeah. Guys do that a lot. "I'd rather stuff it up than ask"
>
> I always tell my apprentices "There is no such thing as a stupid
> question". This of course needs to be taken in context with the subject
> being discussed.
> As an experienced diesel mechanic, I would much rather someone ask me a
> question instead of making that mistake. EG: I had an apprentice change
> gearbox oil in a truck, he put the wrong grade oil in, if the truck went
> out it would have blown the gearbox costing several thousand dollars. He
> didn't ask the seemingly stupid question. I had to ask him what oil he
> put in. So in my 2 cents worth, it is infinitely better to ask a silly
> question rather than stuffing something up :)
>

"There are no stupid questions just inquisitive idiots" - A demotivational
post. :-)

If a nunery is for nun, what's a potpourri for? ;-)

There have been a number of times where I've worked with folks
who asked questions that made it very clear that they had no
clue of the job they were doing. This was made all too clear
when I inherited a network from such an engineer only to find
out that he didn't understand subnet masking. I spent the next
9 months rebuilding the customers network. In the interim I had
to bould routes with bubble gum and bailing wire.

As a general rule I suggest that you ask questions, even if they're
stupid questions. At least you're willing to learn and that counts
for something. But be wary of experts asking questions, some may prove
to be inquisitive idiots!

--
Linux Home Automation         Neil Cherry       EraseMEncherryspamlinuxha.com
http://www.linuxha.com/                         Main site
http://linuxha.blogspot.com/                    My HA Blog
Author of:            Linux Smart Homes For Dummies

2009\04\17@091438 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>If a nunery is for nun, what's a potpourri for? ;-)

<VBG> or as one quote (I think I got it from this list) says ...

A train stops at a train station. A bus stops at a bus station.
On my desk I have a workstation...

2009\04\17@102215 by Peter

picon face
Jinx <joecolquitt <at> clear.net.nz> writes:
> Or the way I used to remember it, until I noticed the above. With
> 'positive' flow, 'a' comes before 'k' (or 'c').

Unless it's a Zener or microwave diode, in which case
your method will be wrong.

Peter


2009\04\17@102959 by Peter

picon face
Michael Algernon <pic <at> nope9.com> writes:
> Toss them a rubber soldering iron.
> MA

Is the expected behavior of the interviewee, for maximum points, to catch the
iron in his/her teeth and apport while making friendly dog noises ? (arf, arf,
arf)

With the state of the economy I don't think that this is a good time for
posting this kind of idea. With so many people reading the internet someone
could end up being tossed a rubber (or not!) iron, if for not other reason,
then to amuse the interviewers (since they wouldn't have a hiring budget
anyway).

Peter


2009\04\17@110112 by Alan B. Pearce

face picon face
>> Or the way I used to remember it, until I noticed the above.
>> With 'positive' flow, 'a' comes before 'k' (or 'c').
>
>Unless it's a Zener or microwave diode, in which case
>your method will be wrong.

But ... if one is familiar enough with those parts to know how to use them,
then one knows they are reverse biased ... ;)))

2009\04\17@172349 by Nate Duehr

face
flavicon
face

On Fri, 17 Apr 2009 08:43:58 -0400, "Neil Cherry" <RemoveMEncherryEraseMEspamEraseMElinuxha.com>
said:
> Dave Joyce wrote:
> > On Fri, 2009-04-17 at 17:55 +1200, Jinx wrote:
> >>> OTOH, I consider it one of my good points that I'm willing to
> >>> ask the "simple" questions that everyone else is too embarrassed
> >>> to admit they don't know the answer to...
> >> Oh yeah. Guys do that a lot. "I'd rather stuff it up than ask"
> >
> > I always tell my apprentices "There is no such thing as a stupid
> > question". This of course needs to be taken in context with the subject
> > being discussed.
> > As an experienced diesel mechanic, I would much rather someone ask me a
> > question instead of making that mistake. EG: I had an apprentice change
> > gearbox oil in a truck, he put the wrong grade oil in, if the truck went
> > out it would have blown the gearbox costing several thousand dollars. He
> > didn't ask the seemingly stupid question. I had to ask him what oil he
> > put in. So in my 2 cents worth, it is infinitely better to ask a silly
> > question rather than stuffing something up :)


Somewhere there's a point where it becomes silly though -- a minimum
skillset for the job, so to speak.

"Is this where his liver goes, nurse?"

> As a general rule I suggest that you ask questions, even if they're
> stupid questions. At least you're willing to learn and that counts
> for something. But be wary of experts asking questions, some may prove
> to be inquisitive idiots!

There's another really annoying side to this, that I'm sure we've all
seen... the person who continually asks the SAME questions, over and
over again, and won't write the answer down in some trusted
filing/organizational system.  I usually don't mind it if they RECOGNIZE
it and SAY they realize that they're asking again, and are standing
there, pen-in-hand, ready to "copy" so to speak...

When the same person asks you the same question they've asked for a year
or more that's something they're required to know for their job
responsibilities, you definitely wonder, "If I just stop answering, will
he lose the job and go away?"  Then your experience kicks in, "No, he'll
either ask someone else, or he will screw it up really badly and get
fired, but I'll have to clean it up."  So you answer the question,
again... and again... maybe with a little more annoyance in your tone
and a polite-but-getting-more-curt reminder that he's asked numerous
times before."

Nate

Nate
--
 Nate Duehr
 RemoveMEnatespam_OUTspamKILLspamnatetech.com

2009\04\18@041619 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
>> When I was probably younger then 10 years old I used my brand new
>> digital multimeter to measure the amount of current a wall socket can
>> produce. Fortunately the range I used was fused and no fireworks
>> occurred, but it took me a while to understand why that idea didn't
>> work! :)

Steadying a solid quality screwdriver on a metal chassis and then sliding
the driver tip forwards until it touches the 230VAC main terminal also
results in fusing - but also fireworks. I cannot remember what I was trying
to do or why I managed to do what I did. The tip welded to the tag and the
arc between chassis and blade eroded the chassis until the arc ceased. The
handle insulation turned out to be adequate for the task. That was many
decades ago and I've never managed to do anything too too similar since. (If
you don't count punching holes through metal cigarette cases with N KiloWatt
plastic welders when you use the case as an impromptu electrode to 'see
how/if this thing works' [TM]. Very exiting. Or could be.



  Russell


2009\04\18@042002 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> You are right, the word "cathode" isn't important here,

I find it important.
In writing circuit descriptions it is ESSENTIAL to have a word to describe
each side of a diode. Because many people don't know which is what you still
have to define it at the start of your decription. BUT once defined you can
use it freely and they can refer to the definition. Without this ability you
either have to make an arbitrary name or avoid using the name at all. The
latter can be done but is awkward.

Use some or all or none of:

Diode:

   The arrow on the diode symbol points from Anode to Cathode.
   This is also the direction of "conventional current flow" through the
diode, from positive to negative.
   Arrow head side is Anode or 'positive side".
   Line side = Cathode or "negative side".
   Current flows from anode to cathode when the anode is more posito\ive
than the cathode.
   Current flow is blocked when the cathode is more positive than the
anode.
   The abbreviation "A" is sometimes used for the Anode.
   The abbrc\viations "C" or "K" are sometimes used for the Cathode.

   Anode = anode = Anode
   Cathode = cathode = Cathode.


E&OE :-)


             Russell

2009\04\18@045010 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> So I keep my  mental attic (which is rather leaky) for other stuff!

It seems that the fuller you stuff them the bigger they get.
Works for me anyway ;-).
Finding what's in the attic is another matter.


R

2009\04\18@060900 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> I find it important.
> In writing circuit descriptions it is ESSENTIAL to have a word to describe
> each side of a diode.

That probably depends on the detail and style you use in the
description. I never really needed those words, there are always other
components attached to each side, so current might for instance flow
from the coil through the diode into the reservoir capacitor.

But I am obviously biased ;)

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2009\04\18@083143 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
> Jinx <joecolquitt <at> clear.net.nz> writes:
>> Or the way I used to remember it, until I noticed the above. With
>> 'positive' flow, 'a' comes before 'k' (or 'c').
>
> Unless it's a Zener or microwave diode, in which case
> your method will be wrong.

Not really - the FORWARD  operation is the same. You just need to be aware
that in some specialist circuits the diode is used "backwards". Seriously.
If you start reorientating your naming to account for specialist usage you
are liable to produce more problems than you remove.

Another example is the use of a photodiode in reverse bias mode. As a photo
diode can be used as a photodetector in both polarities, and as the results
and circuitry differ for each, then getting the diode naming etc correct and
then working out how it's used is a very good idea [tm]. Interestingly, the
reverse polarity mode is usally the preferred one.

A zener diode is (arguably) a poor 'ordinary' diode with an optimised
reverse breakdown capability.

In the SL2 BOGO light there are two identical MOSFETS. They are connected
with opposite polarities relative to supply. One is the switch in a standard
SMPS circuit. Why is the other one connected "backwards" and what does it do
? :-).


        Russell






2009\04\18@090015 by Russell McMahon

face
flavicon
face
>> I find it important.
>> In writing circuit descriptions it is ESSENTIAL to have a word to
>> describe
>> each side of a diode.

> That probably depends on the detail and style you use in the
> description. I never really needed those words, there are always other
> components attached to each side, so current might for instance flow
> from the coil through the diode into the reservoir capacitor.

As I noted, it is possible to work around the need to actually talk about
the diode in adequate detail. Like eg being hailed by someone in the street
who knows who you are and launches into a friendly conversation while you
desperately try to work out who they are. Perhaps that doesn't happen to you
:-). Aha - it's Mr Diode!


  Russell

2009\04\18@124127 by John Gardner

picon face
> But I am obviously biased ;)

OK - I'll bite. Forward, or reverse?

Jack

2009\04\18@131535 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
John Gardner wrote:
>> But I am obviously biased ;)
>
> OK - I'll bite. Forward, or reverse?

Knowing my character forward is out of the question, and reverse is too
obvious. Maybe perpendicular.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2009\04\18@131607 by M.L.

flavicon
face
On Thu, Apr 16, 2009 at 12:26 AM, William "Chops" Westfield
<RemoveMEwestfwTakeThisOuTspamspammac.com>wrote:

{Quote hidden}

I know people who have been asked to write code on paper which is just
frustrating and tedious. Though I would say that you should be able to get
semicolons and syntax correct. Inserting lines of code isn't easy on paper.
-

2009\04\18@132431 by M.L.

flavicon
face
On Thu, Apr 16, 2009 at 4:51 AM, Alan B. Pearce <EraseMEAlan.B.PearcespamspamspamBeGonestfc.ac.uk>wrote:

{Quote hidden}

I don't think anyone disagrees that experience is just as valuable as
education. The problem is when you have two people with equal experience and
one has more education. Even if they seem identical the one with the extra
piece of paper wins. The hypothetical technician with 20 years experience
may know as much as the MSEE with 5 years experience but it doesn't mean
that they'd get hired over the MSEE. I'm passing no judgment here, it's just
the way it happens.

--

2009\04\18@142417 by Sean Breheny

face picon face
On Thu, Apr 16, 2009 at 1:29 AM, Wouter van Ooijen <RemoveMEwouterKILLspamspamvoti.nl> wrote:
> To recall which side is the cathode I have to go through a mental
> process: Cathode. There used to be cold-cathode tubes. So the default
> cathode was warm. So that's where they boiled the electrons. So that was
> the negative side. Current flows towards the electrons-side, so the
> cathode is the band. Amazingly, I get the process right about 50% of the
> time.

Isn't that about the same rate as you'd get by random guessing? ;)

>
> --
>
> Wouter van Ooijen
>
> -- -------------------------------------------
> Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
> consultancy, development, PICmicro products
> docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu
>
> -

2009\04\18@145147 by Wouter van Ooijen

face picon face
> Isn't that about the same rate as you'd get by random guessing? ;)

Yes, I could achieve the same result if I reverse-biased the diode and
derived the answer from get generated noise. But obviously I don't know
how to do that because I don't know the cathode from the anode, so that
option is not open to me.

But in the meantime I got the Olimex arm-usb-ocd working within my
application building tool! Next I must find out why this works with some
Olimex boards but not with the -MT (character LCD) boards.

--

Wouter van Ooijen

-- -------------------------------------------
Van Ooijen Technische Informatica: http://www.voti.nl
consultancy, development, PICmicro products
docent Hogeschool van Utrecht: http://www.voti.nl/hvu

2009\04\18@164654 by Rolf

flavicon
face
M.L. wrote:
>>    
>
> I don't think anyone disagrees that experience is just as valuable as
> education. The problem is when you have two people with equal experience and
> one has more education. Even if they seem identical the one with the extra
> piece of paper wins. The hypothetical technician with 20 years experience
> may know as much as the MSEE with 5 years experience but it doesn't mean
> that they'd get hired over the MSEE. I'm passing no judgment here, it's just
> the way it happens.
>
> --
>  
Actually, I disagree to some extent and in my position is that it is
never clear-cut. To illustrate, using the devil's advocate method:

Your argument about education making the difference is *very* seldom the
'positive' case (at least in my industry - software for financial
applications).

You have two people interviewed. Experience is similar. Your 'offer' to
the less educated person can be more 'favourable'.... i.e. you can pay
the person with less education less money, and get a person who has
proven that they can do the same work as the more educated person, and
is possibly more dedicated to advancement 'on the job'. Aptitude is more
valuable than education, but comes at a cheaper price (especially in
computers).

Another thing. Two candidates with similar experience, the more
'personable' person gets the nod. You employ the person you get the
better 'feel' for in the interview, regardless of the education, just so
long as both candidates can show they can do the required job.

There are always many factors in an employment circumstance... and it
can never be simplified down to education or documentation.

Basically, I am not picking an argument here... just saying that I have
seen it happen where having more education puts you at a disadvantage...
and, from a philosophical point of view, if a less educated person has
accomplished what the more educated person can do, then the logic can
get reversed.... why has the educated person been under-achieving?

Rolf

2009\04\19@234449 by Peter

picon face
Russell McMahon <apptech <at> paradise.net.nz> writes:
> SMPS circuit. Why is the other one connected "backwards" and what does it do

Active controlled rectifier ? There are many uses for 'reverse' connected
MOSFETs and their pesky parasitic body diodes.

Peter


2009\04\20@001323 by Peter

picon face
In sufficiently complex system analysis, asking questions is not useful, one has
to know which ones to ask and what decision tree to follow. Going down the list
randomly would mean 100 man-years to get to the problem even in simple cases.
Embedded software systems tend to be like that. I have met people who asked
questions like machine guns and got the answers (requires some patience but
everyone willingly teaches an eager beaver who is sympathetic and young) and
remembered most of them, but that is useless in general if the underlying logic
and foundation knowledge is missing. So excessive question-asking is undesirable
in reality. In general someone who does some kind of work should be able to do
it and only require minimal directing and hand-holding (*after* training -
no-one is born omniscient and some employers strongly believe that candidate
testing will bet someone who 'can do it' and skip the training).

Peter


2009\04\21@040339 by Vitaliy

flavicon
face
Russell McMahon wrote:
>>> When I was probably younger then 10 years old I used my brand new
>>> digital multimeter to measure the amount of current a wall socket can
>>> produce. Fortunately the range I used was fused and no fireworks
>>> occurred, but it took me a while to understand why that idea didn't
>>> work! :)
>
> Steadying a solid quality screwdriver on a metal chassis and then sliding
> the driver tip forwards until it touches the 230VAC main terminal also
> results in fusing - but also fireworks. I cannot remember what I was
> trying
> to do or why I managed to do what I did. The tip welded to the tag and the
> arc between chassis and blade eroded the chassis until the arc ceased. The
> handle insulation turned out to be adequate for the task. That was many
> decades ago and I've never managed to do anything too too similar since.
> (If
> you don't count punching holes through metal cigarette cases with N
> KiloWatt
> plastic welders when you use the case as an impromptu electrode to 'see
> how/if this thing works' [TM]. Very exiting. Or could be.

Yours truly, at around the age of 9, trying to charge a dead "D" cell from
220V AC. Attached wires to the battery with play-doh. Deep breath, plugged
in -- "BZZZZ..." (lights dim, play-doh melts, battery falls to the floor).
Let's try it on a lighbulb.. ok -- bulb lights up a little bit.. AHA! NEED
TO CHARGE LONGER!  So.. add more play-doh, shove the wires in deeper...

BZZZZT!!..

Lights go out completely. Mom rushes into the room, "Are you OK?" Notices
the fear in my face (boy, am I in trouble!)  "Did you get scared? Don't be
afraid, they just turned off the electricity."

The next day a repairman would explain to my grandmother that the
electricity "wasn't making it in". A typical homemade fuse (a piece of #16
bare copper wire wrapped around a burned-out fuse) forced the short circuit
to find another weak spot (incoming line just outside the apartment).

I never told the poor women what actually happened that evening. :-)




2009\04\21@040450 by Vitaliy

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face
William "Chops" Westfield wrote:
> On Apr 16, 2009, at 12:05 PM, John Ferrell wrote:
>>  think it was Ben Franklin who said "It is better to remain silent  
>> and have
>> others think you are a fool than to speak and remove all doubt,"
>
> OTOH, I consider it one of my good points that I'm willing to ask the  
> "simple" questions that everyone else is too embarrassed to admit they  
> don't know the
> answer to...

"Asking questions" is not the same as "saying nonsense."


2009\04\21@041040 by Vitaliy

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Peter wrote:
>> Toss them a rubber soldering iron.
>> MA
>
> Is the expected behavior of the interviewee, for maximum points, to catch
> the
> iron in his/her teeth and apport while making friendly dog noises ? (arf,
> arf,
> arf)
>
> With the state of the economy I don't think that this is a good time for
> posting this kind of idea. With so many people reading the internet
> someone
> could end up being tossed a rubber (or not!) iron, if for not other
> reason,
> then to amuse the interviewers (since they wouldn't have a hiring budget
> anyway).

Heh!  Catbert would be proud.

>:-)


2009\04\21@082925 by cdb

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:: Yours truly, at around the age of 9, trying to charge a dead "D"
:: cell from 220V AC.

When I was about 14/15 I contacted the Ever Ready/Union Carbide head
office in Australia and asked for their technical notes. They actually
sent a whole load of bumph including a technical note and schematic of
how to recharge non rechargeable batteries. I think Varta had a
similar technical note.

Times change - though I'm sure the batteries could still be persuaded
to recharge to some extent.

Colin
--
cdb, colinSTOPspamspamspam_OUTbtech-online.co.uk on 21/04/2009

Web presence: http://www.btech-online.co.uk  

Hosted by:  http://www.1and1.co.uk/?k_id=7988359







2009\04\21@154513 by Vitaliy

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cdb wrote:
> :: Yours truly, at around the age of 9, trying to charge a dead "D"
> :: cell from 220V AC.
>
> When I was about 14/15 I contacted the Ever Ready/Union Carbide head
> office in Australia and asked for their technical notes. They actually
> sent a whole load of bumph including a technical note and schematic of
> how to recharge non rechargeable batteries. I think Varta had a
> similar technical note.
>
> Times change - though I'm sure the batteries could still be persuaded
> to recharge to some extent.

I remember reading an article on this, someone went through the pains of
running hundreds of tests to figure out the appropriate charge current. The
article mentioned that the batteries used in higher-current applications
(powering motors, flashlights) could be recharged more easily, than ones
used in slow-draining applications (transistor radios).

I'm not sure what my 220V AC defibrillator did to make the battery come back
to life. It probably just punched a hole through zinc oxide and allowed the
electrolyte to come in contact with some fresh zinc.

Vitaliy

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