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'[PIC] Programing speed: ICSP vs Bootloader'
2009\03\31@145358 by Peter Onion

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OPSE, forgot the PIC tag first time....


In very general terms, which is the quickest method of programing
a PIC ?  

I have up to now used a home brewed ICSP programer that takes blocks of
code from a PC via an RS232 link, then programs them into a PIC.

For my next project I'm expecting to have a lot of code and I'm just
wondering if it will be any quicker to use a boot loader.

PeterO



2009\03\31@150301 by olin piclist

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Peter Onion wrote:
> In very general terms, which is the quickest method of programing
> a PIC ?
>
> I have up to now used a home brewed ICSP programer that takes blocks of
> code from a PC via an RS232 link, then programs them into a PIC.
>
> For my next project I'm expecting to have a lot of code and I'm just
> wondering if it will be any quicker to use a boot loader.

Either one is writing to the same program memory, so the write time is
inherently limited to what the flash can do.  Both should be about the same
assuming you don't have a communications bottleneck.

Most of the newer PICs can write more than a single word at a time, so write
time isn't the issue it used to be with something like a 18F877.


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Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.


'[PIC] Programing speed: ICSP vs Bootloader'
2009\04\01@144903 by Peter Onion
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On Tue, 2009-03-31 at 14:05 -0500, Olin Lathrop wrote:
> Peter Onion wrote:
> > In very general terms, which is the quickest method of programing
> > a PIC ?
> >
> > I have up to now used a home brewed ICSP programer that takes blocks of
> > code from a PC via an RS232 link, then programs them into a PIC.
> >
> > For my next project I'm expecting to have a lot of code and I'm just
> > wondering if it will be any quicker to use a boot loader.
>
> Either one is writing to the same program memory, so the write time is
> inherently limited to what the flash can do.  Both should be about the same
> assuming you don't have a communications bottleneck.

That's pretty much what I thought was the situation.

> Most of the newer PICs can write more than a single word at a time, so write
> time isn't the issue it used to be with something like a 18F877.

I'm using 18F parts and my programer takes advantages of the paged write
modes so I don't think I can make that go any faster, and the RS-232
link is maxed out as well.

BTW, thanks for answering my question, not some question you thought I
should have asked ;-)

PeterO



2009\04\01@172942 by peter green

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> Either one is writing to the same program memory, so the write time is
> inherently limited to what the flash can do.  Both should be about the same
> assuming you don't have a communications bottleneck.
Depends on the pic.

For example on first gen 18F chips you can write the panels (of which
there are 4 on a 452) in parallell with ICSP but you can only write one
8 byte block at a time with self programming.

2009\04\01@174111 by olin piclist

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peter green wrote:
> For example on first gen 18F chips you can write the panels (of which
> there are 4 on a 452) in parallell with ICSP but you can only write one
> 8 byte block at a time with self programming.

In theory, but hardly any (any?) PIC programmers made use of the very
cumbersome multiple panel writes.  In newer PICs Microchip has fixed this
and made the single write buffer larger instead.


********************************************************************
Embed Inc, Littleton Massachusetts, http://www.embedinc.com/products
(978) 742-9014.  Gold level PIC consultants since 2000.

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