Searching \ for '[PIC]Driving stepper motors' in subject line. ()
Make payments with PayPal - it's fast, free and secure! Help us get a faster server
FAQ page: massmind.org/techref/microchip/ios.htm?key=stepper
Search entire site for: 'Driving stepper motors'.

Exact match. Not showing close matches.
PICList Thread
'[PIC]Driving stepper motors'
2009\06\02@135250 by Nathan House

picon face
What's the best way to drive a couple of stepper motors with a PIC?
Specifically, these stepper motors:
http://www.mpja.com/prodinfo.asp?number=17748+MS

The only two ways I can think of doing this are:

1) Transistors
2) Stepper motor driver IC

Which do you think would work better? I'm having trouble finding a 2A
stepper motor driver :-)

2009\06\02@135620 by Christopher Cole

flavicon
face
On Tue, Jun 02, 2009 at 12:52:48PM -0500, Nathan House wrote:
> What's the best way to drive a couple of stepper motors with a PIC?
> Which do you think would work better? I'm having trouble finding a 2A
> stepper motor driver :-)

Check out Allegro Micro:
http://www.allegromicro.com/en/Products/Categories/ICs/motor.asp

-Chris

--
| Christopher Cole, Cole Design and Development, LLC          spam_OUTcoleTakeThisOuTspamcoledd.com |
| Embedded Software Development and Electronic Design       http://coledd.com |
| Stow, Ohio, USA                                                800-518-2154 |

2009\06\02@140243 by Bob Axtell

face picon face
Actually, ST has some identical devices at a lower price and better
availability (Mouser & Digikey).

--Bob A

On Tue, Jun 2, 2009 at 10:47 AM, Christopher Cole <.....coleKILLspamspam@spam@coledd.com> wrote:
{Quote hidden}

>

2009\06\02@141152 by Nathan House

picon face
>Check out Allegro Micro:
>http://www.allegromicro.com/en/Products/Categories/ICs/motor.asp

Thanks for the link! Just after a quick glance, it looks like the lowest
output voltage on any of these drivers is 8V. Since the motor that I will be
buying (the one that I linked to) says it's 3.6V, do you think that will be
a problem?

2009\06\02@144101 by Christopher Cole

flavicon
face
On Tue, Jun 02, 2009 at 01:11:51PM -0500, Nathan House wrote:
> >Check out Allegro Micro:
> >www.allegromicro.com/en/Products/Categories/ICs/motor.asp
>
> Thanks for the link! Just after a quick glance, it looks like the lowest
> output voltage on any of these drivers is 8V. Since the motor that I will be
> buying (the one that I linked to) says it's 3.6V, do you think that will be
> a problem?

Not a problem, you strap the driver chip for the required drive current
based upon your motor, with consideration for the desired speed and torque
that you need.  The steppers are driven in current-control mode.

Take care,
-Chris

--
| Christopher Cole, Cole Design and Development, LLC          .....coleKILLspamspam.....coledd.com |
| Embedded Software Development and Electronic Design       http://coledd.com |
| Stow, Ohio, USA                                                800-518-2154 |

2009\06\02@184601 by Jinx

face picon face
> 1) Transistors
> 2) Stepper motor driver IC

The L297 / L298 pair are commonly used together

L297 logic interface

http://www.st.com/stonline/products/literature/ds/1334/l297.htm

L298 power driver

http://www.st.com/stonline/books/ascii/docs/1773.htm

Microchip have an application note for a PIC functioning as a logic
interface like the L297, which is the more expensive of the above
pair. It wouldn't be hard to write your own

The L298 is very good value for money and it's hardly worth trying
to emulate it with discrete parts

Using a motor rated lower than the supply is not a problem. One of
the functions of a driver is to measure the current through the coils and
cut the drive if it exceeds a defined value. The L298 does this with a
sense resistor and comparator. Another technique is to use a power
resistor in series with each coil

A well-regarded stepper tutorial which explains all the basics

http://www.cs.uiowa.edu/~jones/step/

2009\06\02@201032 by VICENTE COLOMAR PRATS

picon face
I also used the L297/L298 pair to drive a stepper with good results.

2009/6/3 Jinx <EraseMEjoecolquittspam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTclear.net.nz>

{Quote hidden}

> -

2009\06\03@031054 by Peter Restall

flavicon
face

On Tue, 2 Jun 2009 12:52:48 -0500, Nathan House wrote:

> What's the best way to drive a couple of stepper motors with a PIC?
> Specifically, these stepper motors:
> http://www.mpja.com/prodinfo.asp?number=17748+MS
>
> The only two ways I can think of doing this are:
>
> 1) Transistors
> 2) Stepper motor driver IC
>
> Which do you think would work better? I'm having trouble finding a 2A
> stepper motor driver :-)

Morning Nathan.

I bought a bunch of L6207s for my stepper project; they do up to 2.5A per
winding IIRC (check the datasheet - it also varies between the type of
package that they come in).  They also do the chopping and have an
overcurrent / overheat flag.  Seemed to work alright with a PIC16F685 (needed
pulse steering for microstepping) and also the PIC16F684 (I couldn't get
microstepping working with that, but fullstepping was fine).  I haven't tried
them with a decent power supply yet though (ie. > 12V @ 1200mA) - I need to
build that.  Of course you could do it yourself with discrete power MOSFETs;
the dead time on the PWM module comes in handy for this.

I also liked the look of the LMD18200 or LMD18201, but they were very
expensive (and only had one channel - the L6207 has two).  Then I found a
very cheap supplier on e-Bay, a few days after I'd got the L6207s - cannot
remember their name though, but just do a search as that's how I found them.
I think their price was for two LMD18200s (*very* cheap when you look at
other suppliers' costs for single units).

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Pete Restall

2009\06\03@031818 by Peter Restall

flavicon
face

On Tue, 2 Jun 2009 13:11:51 -0500, Nathan House wrote:

> Thanks for the link! Just after a quick glance, it looks like the lowest
> output voltage on any of these drivers is 8V. Since the motor that I will be
> buying (the one that I linked to) says it's 3.6V, do you think that will be
> a problem?

That tends to be typical; steppers are usually driven from higher voltages
for higher torque, but the current in the windings is limited.  Check out
this link, which isn't a bad starting resource on steppers and how to drive
them:

       http://www.cs.uiowa.edu/~jones/step/index.html

Take a look around http://www.cnczone.com too - there's lots of posts in there
about the electronics side of things (plus some general 'rules of thumb'
on determining safe maximum voltages for steppers, which isn't generally
specified in manufacturers' datasheets).  You'll have to dig for that sort
of info though.

Regards,

Pete Restall

2009\06\03@054632 by Nicola Perotto

picon face
Hi Nathan,
There one important question/information: it is an hobby project?
This can drive to very different responses!

Nathan House wrote:
> What's the best way to drive a couple of stepper motors with a PIC?
> Specifically, these stepper motors:
> www.mpja.com/prodinfo.asp?number=17748+MS
>  
Look at the datasheet: the data in the web page are different!
> The only two ways I can think of doing this are:
>
> 1) Transistors
> 2) Stepper motor driver IC
>
> Which do you think would work better? I'm having trouble finding a 2A
> stepper motor driver :-)
>  
You can use some ULN2003 or similar.


2009\06\03@084455 by Nathan House

picon face
>There one important question/information: it is an hobby project?
>This can drive to very different responses!

Yes, this is a hobby project. Sorry for not clarifying that.

One requirement for my motor controller is that it needs to be through-hole,
like a PDIP. The L298HN comes in a MULTIWATT 15L IN LINE package, which I've
never heard of. Does anyone know if this package would work for me, or
should I not continue looking at this driver?

The ULN2003 looks as if it only provides .5A (unless you can somehow combine
channels?), which would not be enough for the motors I'm planning on using.

2009\06\03@090619 by Jinx

face picon face
> The L298HN comes in a MULTIWATT 15L IN LINE package,
> which I've never heard of. Does anyone know if this package would
> work for me, or should I not continue looking at this driver?

Multiwatt is a common package for power devices like audio amps. They
have heavier pins than ICs and mount vertically with the heatsink able to
be bolted to a panel, eg like you'd find in many car stereos

There are two rows of pins. The front row of 8 is on 0.1" spacing, the
second row of 7, also 0.1" spacing, is 0.2" behind the first, with back pins
between the front. It's quite similar to a DB15 (eg PC game port) except
the 0.2" between rows. A DB15 is 0.1"

The pins of either row are long enough to bend sideways to fit a 0.1" grid,
like a narrow DIP IC, so would work with Vero-type board. Trust me,
got one right here

More... (looser matching)
- Last day of these posts
- In 2009 , 2010 only
- Today
- New search...