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'[TECH] UFO over Phoenix -- April 19, 2009'
2009\04\20@014458 by Vitaliy

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My wife and I were having tea in the backyard, and noticed what looked like
a flashing star (medium brightness) in the eastern sky, that was slowly
moving in the direction from north to south. I spotted it around 10 pm, and
it disappeared before reaching the horizon around 10:17 pm. The unusual part
(to me) was that the "star" was flashing at a rate of ~10 Hz.

I remember using a site that listed visible satellites based on the
geographic location. Can someone provide a link, or maybe even identify the
object?

Vitaliy

2009\04\20@015154 by Benjamin Grant

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science.nasa.gov/Realtime/jtrack/3d/JTrack3d.html

based on that site, it appears the astrid II is relatively close to your
location, but i could be wrong
Ben

On Mon, Apr 20, 2009 at 1:44 AM, Vitaliy <spam_OUTspamTakeThisOuTspammaksimov.org> wrote:

{Quote hidden}

> -

2009\04\20@025132 by Vitaliy

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Benjamin Grant wrote:
> http://science.nasa.gov/Realtime/jtrack/3d/JTrack3d.html
>
> based on that site, it appears the astrid II is relatively close to your
> location, but i could be wrong

What type of satellite would be expected to exhibit this strange "flashing"
behavior?

Vitaliy

2009\04\20@031716 by Tony Smith

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> My wife and I were having tea in the backyard, and noticed what looked
like
> a flashing star (medium brightness) in the eastern sky, that was slowly
> moving in the direction from north to south. I spotted it around 10 pm,
and
> it disappeared before reaching the horizon around 10:17 pm. The unusual
part
> (to me) was that the "star" was flashing at a rate of ~10 Hz.
>
> I remember using a site that listed visible satellites based on the
> geographic location. Can someone provide a link, or maybe even identify
the
> object?


http://www.heavens-above.com can tell you what was overhead and its path.  Most
satellites are in view for 5-10 minutes, up to a couple of hours after
sunset (and before sunrise).

Flashing can be caused by tumbling, usually rocket boosters or dead
satellites.  Sometimes they vent fuel and that causes them to spin.  10Hz is
a bit fast though.  It could have been a bird flapping its wings - I've, ah,
ahem, been caught out before.

Handy site - 'Iridium flares' can be spectacular even in city areas.  One
less Iridium now that it was taken out by a Russian satellite.  Still, they
were going to de-orbit them all at one point.

Tony

2009\04\20@082504 by olin piclist

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Vitaliy wrote:
> My wife and I were having tea in the backyard, and noticed what
> looked like a flashing star (medium brightness) in the eastern sky,
> that was slowly moving in the direction from north to south. I
> spotted it around 10 pm, and it disappeared before reaching the
> horizon around 10:17 pm. The unusual part (to me) was that the "star"
> was flashing at a rate of ~10 Hz.

That was the aliens scouting landing sites in the Mazatzal and Superstition
Mountains for the upcoming invasion.  They were also jamming the WWVB signal
to Bob.  When you look up and see Mt Ord missing or only three peaks instead
of four it's time to head for the hills.  Oh, wait, the aliens are in the
hills and you're on the plain.  It's time to tuck your head between your
legs and ... (after putting on your tin foil hat, of course).

2009\04\20@110707 by Artem Zezyulinskiy

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I have seen this when a satellite turn around its axe and solar panels
reflect the sunlit with the frequency of rotation.

Vitaliy a écrit :
{Quote hidden}

--
Artem ZEZYULINSKIY

2009\04\20@112434 by Herbert Graf

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On Sun, 2009-04-19 at 23:50 -0700, Vitaliy wrote:
> Benjamin Grant wrote:
> > science.nasa.gov/Realtime/jtrack/3d/JTrack3d.html
> >
> > based on that site, it appears the astrid II is relatively close to your
> > location, but i could be wrong
>
> What type of satellite would be expected to exhibit this strange "flashing"
> behavior?

Any satellite that rotates will do that, depending on how the sun hits
the flashy bits.

TTYL

2009\04\21@021948 by Vitaliy

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Olin Lathrop wrote:
> That was the aliens scouting landing sites in the Mazatzal and
> Superstition
> Mountains for the upcoming invasion.  They were also jamming the WWVB
> signal
> to Bob.  When you look up and see Mt Ord missing or only three peaks
> instead
> of four it's time to head for the hills.  Oh, wait, the aliens are in the
> hills and you're on the plain.  It's time to tuck your head between your
> legs and ... (after putting on your tin foil hat, of course).

Hm, you seem to know far too much for a lowly Microchip Certified Gold Level
Consultant... I knew it: you're one of them!

2009\04\21@082416 by olin piclist

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Vitaliy wrote:
> Hm, you seem to know far too much for a lowly Microchip Certified
> Gold Level Consultant... I knew it: you're one of them!

Naw, I just did a few PIC projects for them.  I'd say more about their evil
plans for dominating the universe, but I'm under NDA.

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