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'lithium-ion batteries'
1997\01\09@022535 by Bob Blick

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Sorry for the off-topic question, but does anyone know how lithium-ion
batteries(such as laptop batteries) like to be treated? Do they prefer to be
kept charged, like lead-acid batteries, or do they prefer to be cycled
deeply, like nickel cadmium or nickel metal hydride? I realize there's a
sophisticated charge controller chip handling things, but if a change of my
habits can effect the lifespan, I'm interested(I'm also superstitious when
it comes to rechargeable batteries).

Thanks, Bob

1997\01\09@062257 by Kerzer Computers

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At 23:19 8/01/97 -0800, you wrote:
>Sorry for the off-topic question, but does anyone know how lithium-ion
>batteries(such as laptop batteries) like to be treated? Do they prefer to be
>kept charged, like lead-acid batteries, or do they prefer to be cycled
>deeply, like nickel cadmium or nickel metal hydride? I realize there's a
>sophisticated charge controller chip handling things, but if a change of my
>habits can effect the lifespan, I'm interested(I'm also superstitious when
>it comes to rechargeable batteries).
>
>Thanks, Bob

Stick to NIMH batteries, they last longer but get cooler when full charge is
reached so be carefull if using delta t charging.

Gordon
>
>
Gordon
                              \\\|///
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----------------------------oOOo-(_)-oOOo--------------------------------------

                                                                  It wasn't me.

1997\01\09@072402 by ang (Chee Foon Tiang)

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Gordon wrote:

>Stick to NIMH batteries, they last longer but get
>cooler when full charge is
>reached so be carefull if using delta t charging.

Sorry, but this is misinformation.

The charger actually relies on the rising temperature
of NiMH batteries for charge termination.
This is called the dT/DT method, which basically is,
charge termination at 0.8 degree C / minute.
NiMH can reach as above 70 degree C if overcharged.
Operating spec is supposed to be no more than 55
degree C. NiMH is also more sensitive to high
temperature damage than other batteries. Basically
the hydride gets boiled off if overcharged.

However, NiMH is still a good choice as recently
Toshiba introduced a new type of NiMH with potentially
twice the capacity of Li-Ion pound for pound.

Peter Tiang
spam_OUTtiangcfoonTakeThisOuTspamhitachi.com.my

1997\01\09@090355 by timetech

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Bob Blick wrote:
>
> Sorry for the off-topic question, but does anyone know how lithium-ion
> batteries(such as laptop batteries) like to be treated? Do they prefer to be
> kept charged, like lead-acid batteries, or do they prefer to be cycled
> deeply, like nickel cadmium or nickel metal hydride? I realize there's a
> sophisticated charge controller chip handling things, but if a change of my
> habits can effect the lifespan, I'm interested(I'm also superstitious when
> it comes to rechargeable batteries).

Dear Bob:

Li-ion batteries don't care when you charge them; do it when convenient,
and don't worry about the procedure. They are sensitive to overcharging,
so some equipment manufacturers are saying you should disconnect the
charger after reaching full charge, but this is just in case of failure
of the protective circuitry. (Early Li-ion batteries were subject to
catastrophic failure modes.)
Motorola recommends leaving their cell phone batteries in the charger
whenever they aren't in use; Toshiba says try not to charge too long.

Despite news to the contrary, Li-ion cells are your best bet for the
next few years. There was a pretty good article in a recent EDN (Dec. 5,
pg. 179) with a good sidebar on construction and history. EDN has a web
site at http://www.ednmag.com.

-- Tom

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